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A Guide to Changing Broadband Providers

By Edited Feb 13, 2014 0 0

Switch Broadband Supplier

When it comes to changing broadband providers there are a number of steps you should follow to ensure that you go through the process and come out the other side with a better provider, without any issues from your previous provider. This article will help you understand how to negotiate to exit the contract with your existing provider, why you should do so, and then how to source the best deal for your particular circumstances. By the end, you should have a clearer picture of how to change broadband providers.

Negotiating with your Existing Provider

Before you begin the process of changing provider you have to talk to your existing provider. If you are still in contract then the likelihood is that you will have exit fees to pay and even penalties. New regulations mean that you shouldn't be paying more than it will cost a provider to service you for the remainder of the contract, but there certainly will be some fees.

If you're exiting because the level of service is so poor and you've got an ongoing dispute with the provider there is little point really going to Ofcom as they don't deal with individual circumstances. What it is worth doing is talking with the provider and seeing if you can get a discounted exit fee in order to demonstrate to you some goodwill. If you have a clear history of issues that cannot be resolved, and you've done everything in your power to allow the provider to solve the challenges, they may well help you to exit their contract with minimal fuss.

Never Just Cancel the Contract

Many people have been caught out by just cancelling the contract, and ended up with black marks on their credit files, and even county court judgements. When you enter into a broadband relationship you start a contract with the provider and you should see it through or negotiate exit. If you decide to cancel your direct debit and forget about it you may get a nasty bite in the bum later when it comes to getting credit for something. Do things properly and you can avoid this heartache.

Changing Provider in a New Home or an Existing Home

If you're changing provider in your existing home then the way in which you go about changing will be a little bit different. You won't have a set date of move and you'll want to, as far as possible, retain you're internet service connection until you are able to get your new connection. This means either seeing your contract out with your current provider or negotiating a cut off date when you can get your new service from another provider. Beware that sometimes if you change provider with ADSL they will cut your line and you'll have to pay a reconnection charge, which could be 130 pounds or more.

If you're moving home the situation is slightly different in that you have a definite time that you want your new broadband to start. In this case, it's important that you have your old broadband ceasing at your old address and your new broadband starting as soon as possible after your move. The reality is that you normally have to have a wi-fi router sent to your new address, so it could be that you have to wait a couple of weeks before activation of the line and may be without broadband for a period of time.

One solution to this interim period is to get a mobile broadband dongle, or to use your mobile phone as a wireless hotspot to get you through that internet downtime. Some providers are very good at getting your service up extremely quickly and it may be that you don't have much downtime at all.

If you're not moving provider, but are actually taking your provider with you then there will probably be a home mover team that will help you to get your new connection in your new location. Tesco Broadband, Sky Broadband, and BT Broadband certainly do have such services.

Choosing a Service Provider

Choosing between the likes of Tesco Broadband, Sky Broadband, Virgin Media Broadband, PlusNet Broadband, Talk Talk Broadband, AOL Broadband, and all the rest can be really confusing. There are so many providers that claim to offer the best service available at the best price point.

The important thing to do as your first step is to find out what's available in your area. This will involve doing a postcode check on one of the many speed test websites. This will provide you with a map of actual speed test results through which you can browse in order to find which providers are providing decent connections in your area. One good service is on uSwitch, although there are many others out there. When it comes to advertised speeds they are not always reliable as they only have to be available to 10 percent of a network’s customer base. Therefore, you're better off finding out what actual speeds different people are receiving in your area through one of these tests.

Once you have a shortlist of providers that are offering a decent level of service in your area it's worth going and doing a broadband comparison and looking at different offers available in the market at this time. These broadband comparison services are available all over the web and can show you every deal that is available in your area. Make sure you read the small print as you don't want to get hit by extra charges in the form of itemised billing, payments that aren't by direct debit, delivery charges, and excessive data usage charges. There really is a minefield to avoid, but by reading the small print you can ensure that you get what you expect to get.

Tesco Broadband or Super Fibre Optic Broadband

At the lower end of the market, you have services such as Tesco Broadband offering a cheap and cheerful broadband service at extremely affordable rates. Tesco Broadband has the same broadband package essentially for all their customers and it costs around 5-10 pounds a month. You're not going to get the best service, but you should get all you need if you are a light consumer.

If you are a medium or heavy consumer of broadband data then you'll need faster speeds and more data. Indeed, if you are a household full or media hungry teenagers who are constantly streaming and watching online TV,, whilst listening to online radio you'll need a truly unlimited package. If this is the case then you will be looking for a package from Sky Broadband, BT Broadband, Be Broadband, or to go for the top level, Virgin Media Broadband package.

There are few things as frustrating as running out of broadband data, or getting excessive charges for overusing your limit, so it is important that you understand the usage profile of all broadband users of your connection in order to get the best deals available to you.

When it comes to changing broadband providers there are a number of steps you should follow to ensure that you go through the process and come out the other side with a better provider, without any issues from your previous provider. This article will help you understand how to negotiate to exit the contract with your existing provider, why you should do so, and then how to source the best deal for your particular circumstances. By the end, you should have a clearer picture of how to change broadband providers.

Negotiating with your Existing Provider

Before you begin the process of changing provider you have to talk to your existing provider. If you are still in contract then the likelihood is that you will have exit fees to pay and even penalties. New regulations mean that you shouldn't be paying more than it will cost a provider to service you for the remainder of the contract, but there certainly will be some fees.

If you're exiting because the level of service is so poor and you've got an ongoing dispute with the provider there is little point really going to Ofcom as they don't deal with individual circumstances. What it is worth doing is talking with the provider and seeing if you can get a discounted exit fee in order to demonstrate to you some goodwill. If you have a clear history of issues that cannot be resolved, and you've done everything in your power to allow the provider to solve the challenges, they may well help you to exit their contract with minimal fuss.

Never Just Cancel the Contract

Many people have been caught out by just cancelling the contract, and ended up with black marks on their credit files, and even county court judgements. When you enter into a broadband relationship you start a contract with the provider and you should see it through or negotiate exit. If you decide to cancel your direct debit and forget about it you may get a nasty bite in the bum later when it comes to getting credit for something. Do things properly and you can avoid this heartache.

Changing Provider in a New Home or an Existing Home

If you're changing provider in your existing home then the way in which you go about changing will be a little bit different. You won't have a set date of move and you'll want to, as far as possible, retain you're internet service connection until you are able to get your new connection. This means either seeing your contract out with your current provider or negotiating a cut off date when you can get your new service from another provider. Beware that sometimes if you change provider with ADSL they will cut your line and you'll have to pay a reconnection charge, which could be 130 pounds or more.

If you're moving home the situation is slightly different in that you have a definite time that you want your new broadband to start. In this case, it's important that you have your old broadband ceasing at your old address and your new broadband starting as soon as possible after your move. The reality is that you normally have to have a wi-fi router sent to your new address, so it could be that you have to wait a couple of weeks before activation of the line and may be without broadband for a period of time.

One solution to this interim period is to get a mobile broadband dongle, or to use your mobile phone as a wireless hotspot to get you through that internet downtime. Some providers are very good at getting your service up extremely quickly and it may be that you don't have much downtime at all.

If you're not moving provider, but are actually taking your provider with you then there will probably be a home mover team that will help you to get your new connection in your new location. Tesco Broadband, Sky Broadband, and BT Broadband certainly do have such services.

Choosing a Service Provider

Choosing between the likes of Tesco Broadband, Sky Broadband, Virgin Media Broadband, PlusNet Broadband, Talk Talk Broadband, AOL Broadband, and all the rest can be really confusing. There are so many providers that claim to offer the best service available at the best price point.

The important thing to do as your first step is to find out what's available in your area. This will involve doing a postcode check on one of the many speed test websites. This will provide you with a map of actual speed test results through which you can browse in order to find which providers are providing decent connections in your area. One good service is on uSwitch, although there are many others out there. When it comes to advertised speeds they are not always reliable as they only have to be available to 10 percent of a network’s customer base. Therefore, you're better off finding out what actual speeds different people are receiving in your area through one of these tests.

Once you have a shortlist of providers that are offering a decent level of service in your area it's worth going and doing a broadband comparison and looking at different offers available in the market at this time. These broadband comparison services are available all over the web and can show you every deal that is available in your area. Make sure you read the small print as you don't want to get hit by extra charges in the form of itemised billing, payments that aren't by direct debit, delivery charges, and excessive data usage charges. There really is a minefield to avoid, but by reading the small print you can ensure that you get what you expect to get.

Tesco Broadband or Super Fibre Optic Broadband

At the lower end of the market, you have services such as Tesco Broadband offering a cheap and cheerful broadband service at extremely affordable rates. Tesco Broadband has the same broadband package essentially for all their customers and it costs around 5-10 pounds a month. You're not going to get the best service, but you should get all you need if you are a light consumer.

If you are a medium or heavy consumer of broadband data then you'll need faster speeds and more data. Indeed, if you are a household full or media hungry teenagers who are constantly streaming and watching online TV,, whilst listening to online radio you'll need a truly unlimited package. If this is the case then you will be looking for a package from Sky Broadband, BT Broadband, Be Broadband, or to go for the top level, Virgin Media Broadband package.

There are few things as frustrating as running out of broadband data, or getting excessive charges for overusing your limit, so it is important that you understand the usage profile of all broadband users of your connection in order to get the best deals available to you.

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