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Advice for a young salesman

By Edited Apr 24, 2015 1 1

You're a young salesman, or young saleswoman, and today is your first appointment.  You have been through your company training or possibly even developed your own sales presentation.  If you are serious about your success, you might have read some of the world famous self help books on the subject of mastering sales.  You are about to attempt a high pressure sales pitch to some 56 year old business owner with a masters degree and a lake house in the Poconos.  You remember what you have been taught; always be closing, assume the sale, ask for the money, create authority.... Here is the issue, this patriarch is not going to be patronized by a twenty-something year old who couldn't even afford to buy the product in the first place.  Oh, and please try telling him how it will effect his families happiness or safety when his four kids are all older then you.  

Here's the point; the rules are different for young people.  I can't tell you that I'm a sales guru or have 30 years experience, however I am a 23 year old sales agent working in the timeshare industry.  I have sold many different products ranging from gym memberships to investment coaching. I have sold $10 items and $50,000 items, and have made a lot of money doing it.  I have read countless books on sales and have been a part of many training classes, but it was't until I learned the art of being young that I started becoming successful. 

The advice in this article is not a substitute for the training and education that one can find in other reading materials or from the mentoring of a seasoned veteran in the business.  This is, however advice on how to tweak the very same information to work for you.

The First thing to remember is to stay new.  This is true for anyone starting a new job in sales, but it is particularly important when you are young.  Everyone is so concerned with learning every bit of information on the product and how to smoothly articulate every feature.  Often times people will help you out and play along if they know you are new, I have had customers purchase just because they were going to be my first sale (it's up to you how many first sales you have :) ) This allows you to fumble through your material a bit when you're new and still come off as a nice young man/woman trying to make it in the world.  

There will be times when you need an authoritative figure to help close a deal and if you're new it's that much easier to bring in a closer to "answer questions" which of course is sales talk for a close the deal.  Also, way to often, a new sales rep will try to teach too much about the features and not focus on the benifits and the emotional reasons which are why they are going to buy.

The Second piece of advise is to relate to the buyer on  a personal level.  So many sales strategies focus on being the authority on the product.  In some cases that can be accomplished even if you are young, however, with youth comes less life experience and that makes it hard to come across as an expert on many products.  Be smart, if your twenty and selling ipads you probably can come off as an expert, if your selling life insurance or funeral plots don't try and pretend you know more about there death wishes then they do.

So, how do I get my point across in a meaningful way without being the authority?  Simple, assume a new role.  If your 22 and your working with a 48 year old couple become one of their kids, if they're 75 become their grandkid.  People trust people of authority, friends and family.  If you can be the authority and the friend that's perfect, if that isn't working then try out talking to them like you would your parents.  

My parents happen to use the timeshare that I sell I very often will say something like; " John, Cindy do you know what favorite time of the year is? Every summer my parents get a condo at the Oregon coast with there timeshare.  No matter what we all go and stay together and play games like we did when we were young....(paint the picture)... Do you guys ever do anything like with your kids?......Well I'll tell you what I'll help you book the trip and I get to come with you deal? I'll just be your 4th kid....ha ha ha...."  laugh it off, but what I was really saying is; I bet you wish you did that with your kids, and I became a subliminal son.  They want to listen to what I have to say and they will beleive it!

When using any of the information above a good salesperson will have no problem building value.  If you can stay fun, young, bubbly and nice you will earn the right to convince them that they want what you have.  They will rarely cut you off, ignore you, or be rude, and the best part of all is they will be honest about their objections.  

So again, you should be able to get them to want it, one problem will be getting them to buy TODAY! which is the only day in sales.  They will feel at ease with politely telling you they will think about it and call you back.  You have gotten them all the way there now how do you bring it home.  Make sure you have a believable reason for them to do it that day.  Don't just say it, you must believe it.  Every product has a lower price or a deal that you can intise them with, make it special.  They will trust you if you believe it and you have gained there trust.  Now you can be a hard closer because you cant let your new friends leave without taking advantage of such a great deal!!!

Once again there are still a big chunk of the population that you can still be high pressure with, it's just a smaller group when your younger.  When you know pressure will push a deal away go to this technique and give it a try.  

My last word of advice for my brothers in sales (and sisters) is believe in what you sell and get paid as much as your worth.  If you can sell then you can sell anything, fight for the job you want and never sell anything you don't think works.  It is not worth it.  

Go make some money!



Apr 5, 2011 7:35pm
More information from the author at successbefore30.blogspot.com
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