Forgot your password?

African American Women - Their Health and Their Skin

By Edited Mar 17, 2014 0 0

Most commercials and magazine articles on skin care are geared toward Caucasian or fair skinned women. What works for lighter skin types often times isn’t applicable to those with darker complexions. Your skin is the largest and one of the most important organs on your body. It serves as a barrier to infections as well as the outer picture of you to the world. When you do see women of color on the television, they usually have perfect glowing skin. What isn’t mentioned is that their skin is perfected by an arsenal of skin care products and aids. The average black woman doesn’t have a room full of professional make up technicians, airbrush machines or thousands of dollars of exclusive cosmetics.  

Infants are the only ones born with perfect skin, but black women who are interested in their skins health, can easily have an even, smooth complexion with proper care and a proper diet. Your road to good skin starts with your inner health. You have to eat healthy and drink plenty of water for the benefits to show on your outer visage. What it boils down to is chocking your daily meals full of nutrient rich food high in vitamins and mineral and cutting back on over processed chemical filled foods. Most or your meals should have large servings of fresh fruit and vegetables. The preparation is equally important. We all know that people of color love fired food, but if you want healthy glowing skin and as well as a healthier lifestyle, then do away with the stereotype. Instead of fried food, opt for baked or sautéed vegetables and meat. If possible, avoid pork. Pork is the only animal that doesn’t rid itself of toxins, so when you eat it, all of those toxins go right into your body and come out on your skin. 

Water consumption is important for skin and health maintenance, drinking a minimum of eight glasses a day is more than a recommendation, it is required for glowing healthy skin. Avoid consuming too much caffeine, which included coffee, energy drinks, soda and chocolate. Alcoholic beverages should also be consumed in limited quantities since they have a dehydrating effect on the body. Getting regular exercise is not only good for your health and your figure, but is is a great way to keep your skin tight and toned. You don’t have to sweat in the gym, if you like walking or jogging, make sure to do it on a daily basis. If you have children, spend an hour playing with them outside in a shaded area. Biking, swimming, and walking your pets are also great ways to get exercise. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle will show on your skin in more ways than one.

Aside from staying active and eating right, African-American skin still requires extra help to look its best. Dark skin often tends to appear ashy or dry. Keeping your skin moisturized with a non clogging formula is the best way to keep your skin lubricated and fresh looking. Women tend to focus only on their face when it comes to product application, but your skin makes up your whole body and is a single organ that requires complete attention. It’s ok to use different types of creams on your face than on your body, but its important to lubricate the skin organ. The best time to apply lotions and creams is right after completing your shower. When you skin is damp from cleaning, the pores are open and ready to absorb vitamins contained in the lotion. Which lotions you use is a matter of personal choice, there isn’t much difference between the high-end brands and the drug store brands, and however, regardless of the price range you are comfortable with, look for creams that have natural ingredients instead of chemicals.          

Black Woman Beauty
Know your skin type before you buy lotions. No two women have the same chemical make up, so there are a variety of skin care options available. Some women have naturally oily skin, so a think lotion would be uncomfortable and counterproductive.  Some women have dry skin, so a thin lotion wouldn’t give the proper amount of lubrication. Still other women have a combination of both and require a lotion that addresses both issues. Once you have discovered the type of skin you have, choose your products so, keep in mind the products meant for your face are different from the ones intended for your body. The average black woman doesn’t use sunscreen lotion; studies show that due to the higher amount of melanin in the skin of darker women, there is a less likely chance of contracting skin cancer. While this is accurate news, skin cancer isn’t the only danger from sun damage. Women of every color are susceptible to sunburn, premature aging and spots from overexposure to the sun. Black women are more susceptible since they most often don’t use sunscreen. Avoid being outdoors when the sun is highest in the sky and wear hats or carry an umbrella when you do have to travel in the sun.                                  

Facial care is typically the most important for every woman. African-American women should find a non abrasive cleanser that can be used daily to clean the dirt from the pores and excess oil from the face. Avoid scrubs that have nut shells or other granular opjects as they cause microscopic tears in the surface of the skin that turn into unsightly spots and craters later in life. Never sleep in your make up, all make up is made from chemicals which will seep into you r skin during the night, use a anti bacterial facial wash every evening to remove your make up and keep your pores open to expunge toxins during the night. Pimples are a part of everyone’s life at some point of the other, squeezing them may seem like a good idea, but it actually pushes the dirt deeper into the pores and can lead to more infections and worse breakouts. After a few days, hold a clean warm towel on the swollen area and gently push, if the bacteria is ready to come out, it will break the surface easily without causing damage to the surrounding area or being pushed deeper into the pores.



Add a new comment - No HTML
You must be logged in and verified to post a comment. Please log in or sign up to comment.


Explore InfoBarrel

Auto Business & Money Entertainment Environment Health History Home & Garden InfoBarrel University Lifestyle Sports Technology Travel & Places
© Copyright 2008 - 2016 by Hinzie Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap

Follow IB Health