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Asking Your Parents for a Raise in Your Allowance

By Edited Oct 19, 2016 0 0

Asking your parents for a raise in your allowance can be successful, if you are willing to put some effort into it. You will need to think like a parent to increase your chances of getting more money each week. Your folks will have some things they will expect from you in return, so you may as well prepare yourself. If you would like to ask your parents for a raise in your allowance, but aren't sure how to do it, here are some pointers.

Make a list:

What do you do around the house now? Do you have set guidelines? Do you hold up to your end? Asking your parents for a raise in your allowance can be more successful if you make a list of the things you do to earn your money now. For best results, separate the lists as follows, so you don't have to ask to borrow money from your parents:

1. Regular duties: These are the things you are expected to do on a regular basis. It can be cleaning, baby sitting a sibling, taking out the trash, or many other things. Be sure you are focused on only those things you do routinely on this portion of the list.

2. Occasional duties: Before asking your parents for a raise in your allowance you should make out a list of the occasional duties you help perform. Perhaps babysitting is on the list. Maybe you are only occasionally required to do the dishes, or mow the lawn when it's needed. This list will be a little shorter.

3. Things you can do: What are some of the other household duties you could do, but don't. Perhaps you're not required to do dishes. Maybe your father takes out the trash each week. There are generally many things you can add to this list, so you shouldn't run out of options.

Make a new list:

When asking your parents for a raise in your allowance, you will need to have a nice, organized list of duties. In the example above you have three sections. You will now want to combine these items into one list, typed on your computer. This will make it look more professional.

Do all chores:

If you recently fell short of completing your chores, you will need to wait a while before asking your parents for a raise in your allowance. They tend to remember these things. To make sure you get on their good side, before you negotiate, you must make sure you hold up your end of the deal. It may take several weeks.

The approach:

Asking your parents for a raise in your allowance will be more successful if you catch them in a good mood. You will really need to be patient, so you don't catch them on a bad day. Simply ask to discuss the situation with them. Be sure you have your list handy.

The meeting:

Take out the typed list you created before asking your parents for a raise in your allowance. Show it to your folks. In the beginning, you simply want to make sure they agree with what you have on your list, and the categories you have the items placed in. Asking your parents for a raise should include an open discussion. Avoid the temptation to get angry if they disagree with some of your duties listed.

The negotiation:

Asking your parents for a raise will generally include some form of negotiations. Point to the items on the occasional duties section to start out the conversation. Ask for their input. Ask them what duties they would like you to do more often, so you can get paid more. Mark the items on the list, so there is no confusion. Each person in the group should have input, not just you. Come to an agreement on what duties could or should be moved into the regular section, assuming you are able and willing to complete them.

Move on the duties you have listed that you are willing to perform, but are not required to perform. Following the same methods as listed above, negotiate and mark the items. Asking your parents for a raise in your allowance is easier when you have it all on paper.

Finally, it's time to negotiate your pay. Asking your parents for a raise in your allowance is generally more successful when you focus on what chores you will do first, rather than the money. Take a look at the items on the list that you are going to add, or do on a regular basis from the occasional section. Speak your mind, tastefully, about how much you believe you should get paid for the extra items. This is a negotiation, so your folks may not agree with you. Try to come to an agreement, making sure you aren't asking for too much. You allowance raise will be getting closer.

The contract:

Your list of duties should be substantially different than it was before. Make out the new list of duties that you agreed on. For a nice touch, talk about, and include a penalty clause for duties not included. This will show your folks you are serious. Asking your parents for a raise this way will impress them. Including a penalty clause is beneficial to both of you. You will know exactly what you stand to lose if you fail to hold up your end of the deal. They will know that they have something in writing to fall back on, should you fail to keep your promises. Allow a space for all parties to sign the contract. The contract can be kept somewhere safe. Perhaps you could make several copies, and hang them on the fridge each week. This will serve as a reminder for all parties.

If you fail:

After asking your parents for a raise in your allowance, you must accept responsibility if you don't uphold your end of the deal. Don't be afraid to admit when you fell short. Be willing to accept the decreased pay. Assure them you will do better the following weeks. Asking your parents for a raise in your allowance can be successful, if you are willing to put some time and effort into it.

This is actually good practice for when you need to ask your boss for a raise. The process is different, but very effective.

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