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Breakdown of The Declaration of Independence

By Edited Jan 2, 2014 0 0

The Declaration of Independence

    The Declaration of Independence is debatably the single most important document in American history.  It was written by the representatives of the thirteen colonies, for the King of England, King George III.  The purpose of this document was to declare the thirteen colonies’ independence from Great Britain.  Most importantly, the document explained to its readers why the declaration was being made.  The declaration was made to prevent England from having power over the colonists in America, being a separate nation.


    There are four main sections in The Declaration of Independence.  The first section, the preamble, explains the colonies’ rights to become its own nation, as well as why the declaration was being made.  The second section is a list of twenty-seven abuses that the King of England placed upon the colonies.  The third section explains the colonies’ repeated failed attempts to peacefully negotiate with the King, ultimately explaining why the separation was just.  The fourth and final section states the colonies’ independence from Great Britain as well as its benefits and responsibilities of being its own nation.


     The preamble explains why the colonies overthrew their ruler, King George III, and decided to become a separate nation from Great Britain.  It starts off by explaining that all men are equal with certain unalienable rights, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, which a government should not violate.  It says that, when those rights are not protected, it is the peoples’ right to create a new government that will protect their rights.  And although governments are not often overthrown, there is a good reason for this one to be ended.  The colonists have been through a lot of history with this tyrannical government that led to its termination.


    There is a list of twenty-seven reasons that the government needs to be overthrown.  It consists of the repeated abuses that King George III had placed upon the colonies.  The King refused to let the colonies be self-governed.  He repeatedly invaded the rights of the people.  He refused a Judiciary system.  He created a legislation that placed taxes on the colonists and cut off trade without their approval, also known as the Trade and Navigation Acts.  The King quartered armed troops and took away their right to a trial by jury.  He took charters, abolished laws, and altered their form of government.  He refused to protect their borders, took away their ships, and hired people to fight the colonists.  To sum it all up, the King was destroying the property and people of the colonies.


    Previously the colonies attempted to peacefully negotiate with the King.  They did so non-violently through repeated petitions that only resulted in violence toward them.  They tried to appeal to British citizens’ shared cultures, common sense of justice, and connections through the economy, but all of these attempts were ignored.  Since their attempts were either violently ended or ignored, the colonists had no choice but to separate from Great Britain.


    The colonies of the United States of America, declaring independence, were given the right to be free and independent states.  The colonies have no loyalties to Britain and are no longer politically connected to them.  They have full power to make their own war, peace, and alliance decisions.  They have the right to create their own laws or acts.  Through all that they were put through with the King, the colonists were finally free from his abuse as a separate nation.


    The Declaration of Independence is a very significant document in America’s history.  It was a very orderly document that described many things.  It explains the colonies’ rights to become its own nation, as well as why the declaration was being made.  It lists the abuses that the King of England placed upon the colonies.  It explains the colonies’ repeated failed attempts to peacefully negotiate with the King, ultimately explaining why the separation was just.  And finally, it states the colonies’ independence from Great Britain as well as its benefits and responsibilities of being its own nation.  Without this declaration America would not be its own nation and would still be controlled by the English.

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