Login
Password

Forgot your password?

Glass Beach

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 1 1

Glass Beach

History tells us that in the early part of the 20th century residents of Fort Bragg California would throw all their household trash over the cliffs and into the Pacific Ocean.  They would throw items like glass, appliances and cars were thrown into the ocean, and the locals in the area would refer to this area as a dump.  Trash piles would actually get so high that they would sometime try and burn what they could from the piles.  This was at the time that local unions owned this land, where dumping had occurred.  By the late 1960’s the water quality control board closed this area. 

Once it had been closed various cleanup crews came in to try and restore the area.  Nature would run its course and waves for sweep up and down the beach for decades.  After decades of waves crashing over top of the old glass it turned this old trash, which consisted of lots of glass from old broken bottles into beautiful glass looking stones in many different colors.  This all occurs in an area that is about forty acres.

This area was later bought by the California state park system in 2002.  This newly formed glass beach was then cleaned up even better and then turned into MacKerricher State Park.  It can be funny sometimes how trash can become a treasure when taken into the right hands.  Since the park has opened a lot has been done to try to restore the cleanliness of the water and the beach for tourists.   The state park is now highly visited and tourists can from time to time find old remnants of trash or glass like stones.  The glass of course is not allowed to be taken from the beach; this is against the law per federal regulations of the park system.  This keeps it nice for all future guests and tourists to see it in the same condition.

Often times before the park system took over the beach, people who did not know what to expect, would sometimes get cuts from walking in the area of the beach.  If the state park system would not have acquired this unique and strange place then we might not have it to visit today.  This is certainly a neat place to visit if you are ever in the northern California area.  So in the future, if you ever visit this state park, please try and respect the park, to help keep it nice, along with any other state park you might visit. 


Advertisement
Advertisement

Comments

May 9, 2011 6:49pm
footloose
Wow - trash to treasure! A hopeful bit of information for sure.
Add a new comment - No HTML
You must be logged in and verified to post a comment. Please log in or sign up to comment.

Explore InfoBarrel

Auto Business & Money Entertainment Environment Health History Home & Garden InfoBarrel University Lifestyle Sports Technology Travel & Places
© Copyright 2008 - 2016 by Hinzie Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap

Follow IB Travel & Places