Recycle your gold and get bucket loads of cash!

Cash in your old, broken & unwanted gold

££ $$ Its worth more than you think! $$ ££

The recession has well and truly kicked in over here in the UK and as everyone knows (or should know) the price of gold goes up in a crisis. Everyone’s scrimping and scrapping to pay the bills but do you know how much potential cash you have lying in your jewellery box or drawers?


Do you have a jewellery box full of old bits & bobs or even just a small broken chain? - If it’s gold its worth cash!


Did you know you could get up to as much as £25 per gram or more?!


Take a look on your local high street, there’s more than likely a pawn broker who could offer you a quote, but did you know you could also sell your items online? All you have to do is simply put your items in the post and wait for your cheque to arrive.


First things first, you need to determine if your gold is real or not. In the UK we have a system called hallmarking, this will tell you where the item was made, the quality of the gold and where the item was certified. (If your jewellery was bought abroad its likely not to have a hallmark)


There are 3-4 sections that make up a full British hallmark.


1. The makers mark - is usually a few initials corresponding to the company or jeweller that made the item.     

2. The finesse mark - which states what carat of gold the item is or % of how much gold it contains.

• Also known as 9 carat (9ct) - there is 37.5% gold in the item and the other is other less precious metal alloys.
•  Also known as 14 carat (14ct) - there is 58.5% gold in the item and the other is other less precious metal alloys.
• Also known as 18 carat (18ct) - there is 75% gold in the item and the other is other less precious metal alloys.
Also known as 22 carat (22ct) - there is 91.6% gold in the item and the other is other less precious metal alloys.
•  &  also known as 24 carat (24ct) - there is 99.0% - 99.9% gold in the item and the other is other less precious metal alloys.


3. The assay office mark – shows where it was tested or produced and certified. There are four assay offices in the UK, each test items and certify them to their carat.
• London - the panther                  
• Birmingham - the anchor   

• Edinburgh - the castle          
• Sheffield- the Tudor rose   

 

4. The date mark (This mark is found on older items and is not compulsory)

An example of a 9ct full British hallmark certified in Birmingham would look like this:
     
      

 

If you can't fnd a hallmark and you’re unsure it is "real" gold take it along to your local pawnbroker, they will be happy to help and can test it for you as well as give you a quote.

Now you know whether you items are "real" or not, so what’s it worth?


Most dealers at the moment determine the price on the weight of the item and carat. Now some pay £5 per gram for 9ct and some pay as much as £15 per gram for 9ct but 22 & 24 ct is worth well over £25 per gram. So let’s imagine you have an old broken chain and a few odd earrings let’s say the weight is 11g and they are 9ct.


For example if you take them somewhere that pays £10 per gram - that’s £110 for something that was lying in your drawer and you can’t even use!


However if you shop around and get £15 per gram you could get £165! - It’s very surprising really!

I sold my gold online and got an amazing price!!


Why dont you have a clear out, recycle your old gold & see how much ou can find!