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Cat Care Tips

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 0 0

Cat Care Tips

Before making decisions to bring home a cat for a pet, you have to consider a few important changes in your lifestyle to make room in your home and your life in general. It's not difficult to care for a cat, if you do it right from the beginning. It can save you a lot of time and money if you follow a certain set of rules and make living for your cat as comfortable and as happy one as possible.

Whether you get your cat from an animal shelter or buy her from breeders is entirely up to you, I would personally adopt her from a kennel or animal shelter or rescue one from the streets. Your responsibility would be to take her to vet for thorough check up. If it has been vaccinated, get the necessary confirmations. If you rescued one, you may do some initial check up on your own as below and you can bring her to the vet later unless there are apparent problems.

Check for:

- Excessive discharges from the ears, this is an indication of an infection.
- Discharge from in between its nails.
- Fever and runny nose (A cats' normal body temperature is about 101 degrees Fahrenheit)
- Pale tongue and lips, indication of anemia among others
- Frequent vomiting; inspect contents of vomit for parasitic worms
- Fleas or ticks
- Open wounds, sores, apparent bald spots and mange
- Stool color and solidity or whether she passes worms
- Difficulty in urinating and blood stained urine
- Poor appetite
- Difficulty in walking or if it's limping
- Behavior; check for overt aggressiveness or fear

Immediately bring her to the Vet if one or more of the above is noticed. Do not overlook the mental health of your new kitty.

If you are inexperienced but would like to try caring for cat, there are things you need to prepare so that you both can be comfortable. Otherwise cleaning after your new furry friend will seem tedious. Then there is the risk of having your furniture getting decorated by her claws. It is also important to be hygienic especially if you have children around as your cats' feet and body will be carrying bacteria and parasites especially after she uses her 'toilet'.

When you bring home your healthy kitty, if her fur is soiled, give her a warm bath. Use a hose with slow streaming warm water, taking care not to get water in her ears, try your best. Use medicated pet shampoo and scrub her body gently, wash in between her paws, tail and groin area. Wash off shampoo completely. Dry her with a clean towel and hair dryer if she doesn't mind it; be sure not to set it on high heat.

Toilet training your kitty is fairly easy depending if she is a kitten or adult cat. An adult cat adapts more easily to its new environment. It is recommended that you keep her confined for 4 to 5 days in a cage large enough with litter sand box and for her to move around freely. Provide adequate drinking water and food. You can her take out of the cage once in a while. This is to train her so she gets used to using the litter sand. Have her 'toilet' ready by placing adequate amount of litter sand in a box and make sure to scoop and clean up after her. Make sure you wash and sanitize your hands after handling soiled litter. Teach your children to do the same. Cats generally like to keep clean; they are very particular about it. It is your responsibility to provide her a clean environment, so that she doesn't look for other cleaner places to ease herself when she is let out of cage.

Always provide fresh and clean drinking water for her. As for cat food, try giving her home made cat food for convenience if you have the time. Otherwise you can choose from the many types of cat food available at Pet Stores.

You definitely need to provide her a scratch post if you don't want her to get her scratch happy nails on your sofa. You can get this at the Pet Store or make one yourself.

There are a whole lot more you can do for your newfound friend, though being moderate is the key here. I have about 11 cats in my apartment and because I have set a certain routine, having them around and caring for them is actually low in maintenance and I also make my own kitty litter. You can do the same with ease, you just need to get a few things in order as I've laid out here and you are set to go.



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