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Childrens introduction to owning pets

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 5 9

Every parent, sooner or later, will be asked to get a pet for their child. The plea generally arrives when puppies or kittens are displayed to lure you to look. Sometimes it is even difficult for parents to resist taking home a dog or cat even though very little thought has gone into that venture.

Instead of caving into taking a pet home then, consider some of these suggestions to plan a little. You know it is a life you are dealing with and maybe even more than one life. The dog or cat could be your responsibility for 11 to 15 years. Say no until you have educated yourself about the necessities of the life of that pet.

1. Can you honestly promise to abide by the needs of that pet for that duration? You know your children will give some thought to the animal and little or no time to the requirements of that living, breathing animal. The major part of adoption of a dog or cat will rest in your lap.

2. Is this animal a must have, want to own or will your child take some responsibility in the needs of the pet? You could very well just look at how chores are done in the house to determine personal responsibility ownership of a pet for your children. Take some time to practice pet owning by giving them the things to do that a pet would need for 2 weeks. Don't tell the child it is only for 2 weeks while you keep track of how well they perform those tasks. Get a bowl of water and a bowl of food. Empty each, everyday to see how that child handles the feeding. The cost of the bag of food will be a good investment to determine the faithfulness of your kid to care for one who cannot feed itself.

3. Pets take money to sustain. If you cannot afford to keep it healthy with proper food and water along with a treat now and then, you could consider a stuffed animal to cuddle. It is estimated a dog requires $35 a month to feed according to: http://www.doggiesparadisce.com This cost can vary regarding the size and activity of the canine. Catfood is more expensive, however the cat appetite is less than that of a dog judging by size alone. Estimate $ 188 for catfood a year, according to http://www.costhelper.com

4. All dogs are pack animals who need daily walks. When you place a dog in the home its needs have to be met by the pack leader, which is you or a responsible family member willing to routinely supply that exercise.

5. Cleaning up excreta is not a nice job, however the cat box needs to be clean otherwise you will find your cat will seek out a place that is clean. That might be a corner in the living room on the carpet, a closet or even in a drawer left open. You won't be able to blame the cat for your lack of providing it with a suitable bathroom. Dogs piddle and poop. Training to go where they are supposed to will take your concentrated effort. If you don't teach, they cannot learn. These take time that you have to ask yourself if you have.

6. Vaccinations and general health maintenance will not only tax your pocketbook, it will attack your heart with decisions of wellness issues. Knowing, for the most part, happy times will greet you time an again, however be aware the unexpected might and probably will sooner or later knock you off your feet. Your children will rely on your decisive character to make correct choices for the animal. Role modeling is certainly set in pet owning when children watch your actions.

7. Training and lesson teaching is not an option if you wish to have a stable environment for your dog. If you don't have the time or money to teach your dog these skills, you and your dog will eventually suffer. Social acceptance is for the safety of your pet, children in the home and visitors too. Unsocialized dogs can nip at you and your children, destroy household items when you are away and perhaps create court suits from others.

Earlier I said it might be more than one life involved when adopting a pet. If a quick, wrong choice is made, your child can be not only upset with the pet being taken out of the home, but it is likely to be remembered for a very long time if the child is above the age of 8.

Taking the pet out of the house tells children so many things. It allows the child to think animals are disposal, don't have a valuable life and follow through is not necessary. Some children apply those messages to other parts of their lives. The foundation of pet ownership can perhaps be brought into their young adult lives to teachers, friends and social group interactions. Later on the lives of spouses, children and employers could be affected.


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Comments

May 30, 2010 10:47pm
Deborah-Diane
These are all such great suggestions for introducing your children to the idea of having pets. Our children all grew up with a variety of pets ... from box turtles and snakes, to cats, dogs and horses! Now, all of our children are grown and still enjoy having at least a couple of pets in their homes. All these animals have truly been a blessing to our family!
May 31, 2010 6:59am
Jack_Luca
Yes, those puppies and kittens do look very cute, but they require a lot of work! When the kids ask, it means Mom and Dad are going to be the ones taking care of the pet!
Jun 26, 2010 7:09pm
Sullysee
Lots of good info and advice.
Jun 30, 2010 8:59am
snowfence
Thanks for the childrens introduction to owning pets!
Jul 12, 2010 4:09am
kims3003
Excellent article with very valuable information. Very important subject. I was raised early on to respect, care for and love animals. I then instilled this with my children who from the very start have always been so caring and loving of animals. They have now grown to be very fond of animals and will do the same with their own children. Nice writing style with a pleasant kind of flow- A+!
Jul 18, 2010 3:45pm
SharonWatterson
all wise considerations to make before getting a pet for a child, thank you for your wealth of knowledge on dogs and adoption of pets.
Sep 11, 2010 9:38pm
southerngirl09
Great tips to consider before adopting a pet. Applying these tips will insure a great outcome for all involved. Thanks for this great article.
Apr 8, 2011 12:15am
cosmopinkice
This is sound and well needed advice. My son, 7 years old, keeps begging for a puppy.
Mar 30, 2013 2:13pm
dashboardc33
Very nicer article about owning pets. Some adults need to read this as well. I have seen so much neglect from not only children but adults too.
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