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Commenting On Websites, Blogs, and Content Writing Sites

By Edited Oct 2, 2015 4 4

Reader's Opinions Are Valuable

This article is two folds.  It is for both the writer of content writing sites, and the reader of HubPages, Infobarrel, and interest-based blogs.  I am of the suspicion that readers do not realize how valuable their words are.  A reader's opinion is like finding a diamond in the rough.  It is remarkable resource that at times, seems very hard to acquire. Nevertheless, it is the most suitable tool to making necessary changes to a personal blog, HubPages hub, and Infobarrel page. The greater diversity found in comments the greater the reward. It also brings the voice of the reader out into the open.  Which is never a bad thing, despite what others believe.

What you trying to say?

Tips and Tricks That Encourage The Reader To Write

Feel Free To Leave Your Trick Behind

Comments also give the writer future writing material, possible storylines, useable quotes, and funny article call-outs.  A funny quote is a great tool for finding new content to write about.  Especially if it is used in unison with something that has already been written.  In today's world of online marketing strategies, being able to cross reference and backlinking two articles together, accounts for better SEO optimization.   Better SEO optimization usually means more ad clicks on AdSense generated ads that provides revenue to an article.  Every time two articles "talk" to one another through the web, Google records that traffic.  This also will help drive traffic to an article, and get the content page ranked as higher quality.

Hustling for comments is not easy business.   Encourage readers to write a remark by engaging them.  Ask them questions about the topic being wrote about.  Invite them to share their point of views, personal experiences, or private thoughts.  It is also accepted to ask them for quotes.  For example if the article is about Mark Twain, ask the reader to post their favorite Mark Twain or Samuel Clemens quote, once they have left their personal review in the comments section.  Even this is not a 100% foolproof plan.  Some readership just do not like writing, have the extra time, nor want to be bothered.  

Writer Heed Readers Comments

And, Do Not Be Afraid To Leave Feedback

Commenting no matter what!

 

 Even this cat has his way of express his feelings.  He does not look happy about being wet, now does he? 

The Online Comment Card

Just like a restaurant comment card, customer service survey, or a review on Yelp.com; a reader needs to write their honest assessment.  However, ninety percent of readers do not post a comment, in the space provided.   I think many readers are afraid of backlash from the author.  Especially if both parties are writers for the same content writing website.  Many readers choose to leave powder-puffed comments instead.

Writing a fluffy comment is not necessarily a bad thing, because those types of comments give a writer (especially a newbie) a sense of belonging.  Which is critical for first time writers.  However, if a person sees that there are obvious typos, grammatical errors, or disconnection in the article..., it is important to leave a constructive criticism.  One trick that has worked great for me is that, I check to see if other readers have already left positive comments.  If there are more than one positive review, then I opt for what I wanted to say to the new author.  

I am always very polite about leaving a constructive comment, review, or feedback.  I thank the writer for bringing up the dialog for conversation.  I will write something like, "Thank you for the great topic!  BTW: you have a typo in paragraph 3."  However, good writers welcomes harsh readers' critiques. They are welcomed by good writers, because they offer a source of debate, a reflective point of view, and as I said before, new ideas to write about and publish.  Authors should recognize that comments give worth and value. The best details come with critiques. Personally, it is how I learned that I used passive voice sentences, wayyyyy too much! 

I also think that selecting the right type of lingo is also helpful when writing a "negative" review.  For instance I never use excessively harsh words like, "bizarre", "gross", "hate", "boring", "awful". Instead I use more "professional" words or phrasing: "It was over the top (bizarre).", "It was not for me (hate).", "I got lost in the middle (boring).", "I respectfully disagree (awful)...", "The graphics were not my taste (gross)".

Important Reasons For Leaving Feedback

One Nationally Recognized Governmental Board's Due Process

Why are comments so important? They are important because they bring out a vast, new, secular approach to new ideas, policies, or laws. When I went about researching for topics for this article, I found a huge amount of websites about writing a comment. There are over 64,000,000 million hits and websites addressing that particular topic. Nevertheless, I could only find one website, which addressed the importance to express an opinion. 

What I discovered was a mission statement, endorsed by an accounting standards board (for all American governing bodies).  Their mission statement was so impressive that I decided to include in this article. A vital part of the board's mission statement requires each board member:

"To carefully weigh the views of its constituents so that standards and concepts will meet the accountability and decision-making needs of the users of governmental financial reports and gain general acceptance among state and local government preparers and auditors of financial reports¦" Due process allows the Board to accomplish this goal through a variety of avenues-public hearings, public forums, task forces, and focus groups. However, the primary means by which the Board currently solicits feedback on its proposals is through a request for written comments." -GASB (Governmental Accounting Standards Board)

Corporations, lawmakers, and grant writers make comment reading a big part of their business. Ever heard of a Focus Group?  Focus groups are a business strategy to find out what a product's demographic might be, and the right price to charge customers. Surveys also produced by focus groups, help redirect customer service policies. 

Employee feedback, surveys, and comment cards are a means which a company can merit the validity to grant career promotions, paid vacation time, give leave of absence pay, or offer medical coverage.  Without careful assessments and employee feedback, corporations are clueless on what future benefits will best suit their employees longterm.  Without these comments, companies would not know what is done wrong or what else needs fixing. Without comments made by the customer or employees, companies are clueless about why people do not want to work them.  Or, why shoppers will not buy their products.

Comments are approachable.  An entity like a government board uses comments as vital facts to carry out big changes such as; tax hikes, new healthcare reform, and term limits.  All important issues which started as comments made by ordinary people, which are now disguised as laws.  Laws pushed through Congressional appropriation boards, which closely follow Gallop polls.  

P'sst, You..., Hey Mister!

Cat Got Your Tongue?

Why didn't you say so!

Don't let the cat catch your tongue!  Spit it out already, and tell the writer what you honestly think.

P'sst, You..., Hey Mister!

Cat Got Your Tongue?

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Comments

Apr 14, 2010 2:05am
StarriKnytes
I cannot agree with you more. The eloquence with which you made your point is unmatched. I can hardly wait for your next article. ~ Starri
Dec 28, 2014 8:33pm
RoseWrites
We need to have discussions to broaden ourselves, to educate and create a better future. It's crucial for breaking down bias, barriers, and injustice.

Even when comments seem negative, I've usually found a better way to express myself. It helps me grow.

Great first article, welcome to InfoBarrel.
Jan 7, 2015 1:34am
Yindee
Thanks for stating the obvious! We read a lot of excellent articles here - even featured ones that nobody comments on. We all feel good if somebody makes a comment and it inspires us to continue.
As you say, writers, manufacturers and organisations in the service industry need feedback - for better or for worse. I appreciated your comment on my article about New year's resolutions because I gave it my all and it is an original concept.
PS: I love your kitties - the white one looks like a mean critic! My cats are Siamese.
Jan 7, 2015 4:55am
LeighGoessl
Interesting topic. I agree it helps us grow. Critiques really are positive in the long run. I've also lways viewed comments as a good way to establish two-way communication. Another site I write on I recently read an article asking, "Should writers always respond to comments". It was interesting to read the varying responses from various writers.
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