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Desperate for a Job - What to Do

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 0 0

Times are tough and many folks are desperate for a job. Does that describe you? The good news is that there are opportunities for unemployed people today to make money and get back on their feet. The fact of the matter is that the world economy has gone through a tremendous recent upheaval. Millions of jobs have been lost and many are only slowly coming back. There are more unemployed people in the United States than there have been in more than twenty years and for many their job prospects are bleak. There are millions of previously employed people who find themselves today desperate for a job.

I need a job!

If you find yourself in this situation then you will have to take a moment to reassess where you are in your life and what you can do to get yourself back on track. Nobody ever plans to find themselves out of work and down on their luck, but such a situation can happen to anyone. The question that becomes how to recover from such a setback and ensure that you have safeguards in place to protect yourself in the future.

The fact of the matter is that for certain fields the job market may never come back. Therefore unemployed individuals who worked in these fields will need to open their eyes to the reality that they are going to have to find a new line of work. This can be jarring, certainly, but it does not have to be debilitating.

How to find a new job

Looking for a new job is not a pleasant activity for most people. However, that does not mean that there are not things that you can do to make the process less unpleasant. The last thing that an unemployed person wants to do is to cold call potential employers looking for work. And research indicates that cold calls are among the least effective ways to find a new job. The best approach is to ask friends who know you well if they can refer to someone that they know well. When you have been given a warm introduction but a trusted third party your odds of being hired are dramatically improved. Reach out to your friends, school acquaintances, extended family and people from your youth. See if they know of any potential employment opportunities for people with your work history and skill set. You might be surprised how far a warm introduction can take you.

Consider returning to school

If you find that you can not find an old job in your chosen field, consider returning to school for further job training. In most cases you will be able to take out a student loan to cover your expenses while you are back in school and an advanced degree will certainly enhance your earning potential. However, it is not advisable to return to school simply to go. You should have a plan for the degree that you wish to attain and how that degree will help you land a better paying job. For instance, a liberal arts undergraduate degree is probably not going to open any employment doors for you and will not do much for your job prospects. But what it will do is give you a mountain of student debt that you will then have to take care of.

Jobs will come back

A final note about the present condition of the job market. While it may seem like the overall employment picture is going to remain hazy for the foreseeable future, you must remember that there is no such thing as a jobless recovery. In time the employment opportunities that you hoped for will return. However, this is definitely a time for action. It is not advisable to simply sit around and wait for the jobs to come back. Take action. Be proactive. And remember that people make their own luck, including in the job market.


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