Login
Password

Forgot your password?

Dog Moving - How To Move House With Your Dog

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 0 0

dog moving (20739)

You landed that new job, and now you need to pick up and move, but what about your dog? If a move goes smoothly, it can be fun and exciting as you embark on a new life, or it can be a horrendous day of mistakes. So, like with most moves, there needs to be a bit of "pre-planning" if you can.

It is hard enough packing up your own things, but dog moving can be hard too. Your faithful pet will actually begin to feel the move before it even happens, due to you packing and getting rid of familiar things. He may start showing signs of anxiety long before the move.

So, in your pre-planning, you have to allow some time for your dog moving. You need to give him lots of love and attention as you pack up your belongings. Try not to move his bed or his dishes until the very last minute so that he has a place to go that is familiar. Make sure and get him outside for lots of exercise to burn off anxieties.

Moving Day

The day of the move, you should try and pre-arrange for a dog sitter. If you dog is comfortable heading out to someone else's house for the day or afternoon, until you are packed up and ready to go, this would be much better.

This way you don't run the risk of having your dog get so upset that he runs away while the moving guys are loading up the truck. Or starts throwing up, like our dog did.

We made the mistake of keeping our dog with us, while the moving truck was emptying the house. He did not run away but stayed in his corner and did not drink or eat and started shaking. It took my kids hours to calm him down.

This was a big mistake. Dog moving is hard on a dog, but it is best to have a dog and small children stay with someone else until the house is packed up. One less thing for you to worry about.

dog moving (20738)

You also need to be ready at the other end. Before you move, you should arrange for a new veterinarian in your next town, find out where any dog parks are, and make sure you have your dogs medical records somewhere handy, just in case you need to take him to a vet before you get unpacked.

This is not the time to replace his favorite toys or bed. He needs some familiarity when he gets to the other end.

If dog moving includes flying, then you will have to have all your shots up to date on your dog. You should really take your dog to your present veterinarian for a complete checkup and refills on any present medications your dog may be taking. Plus the purchase of a good crate, one that is recommended for flights. Check with your airline, they have all the information on moving dogs and any other pets.

Driving With Your Dog

If you are driving to the next location, then you will need to get either a crate for the car or a doggy seat belt.

If you have a super nervous dog, then you may need to get some medication from your vet to help calm him down. But try and think of this before you start packing. Try to anticipate the reaction of your dog the best you can, and then you are prepared.

First Thing On The To Do List.. Walk The Dog
dog moving

Once you get to the other end, I know there will be a thousand and one things that need to get done, but try and take the time, especially that first day and night to spend with your dog. They will need some familiarity to help them. Take them for a walk, get to know the neighborhood a bit, before you even start unpacking your boxes.

A good long walk, and your dog moving day will feel a lot better. They should sleep well that first night if you tire them out. A tired dog is much easier to deal with then a wired dog. So after a day of dog moving and everything else, take your special friend out and both of you get some exercise. You will both feel calmer and ready for your new life!

Also read: http://www.infobarrel.com/Road_Trip_With_Your_Dog%253f_-_Ten_Tips_To_Make_Traveling_With_Your_Dog_Fun


Advertisement
Advertisement

Comments

Add a new comment - No HTML
You must be logged in and verified to post a comment. Please log in or sign up to comment.

Explore InfoBarrel

Auto Business & Money Entertainment Environment Health History Home & Garden InfoBarrel University Lifestyle Sports Technology Travel & Places
© Copyright 2008 - 2016 by Hinzie Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap

Follow IB Pets & Animals