Login
Password

Forgot your password?

Employee Leaving, Farewell Message - What You Should Say When You Quit Your Job

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 0 1

If you have decided the time is right to leave your current position, it may be wise to write an employee leaving, farewell message to your coworkers or bosses. If you are quitting, and will lose contact with coworkers while heading for greener pastures, there's sure to be some way to convey your sentiments in a kind and professional way. So, whether you are retiring, accepting a new position with another company, or even taking a promotion to another office or location within the same company, there is bound to be a good way to address the situation. An employee leaving, farewell message should come from the heart, in most cases.

Things to include:

If you are quitting your job, you may want to compose a nice employee leaving, farewell message for your coworkers or bosses. It's really important to remain professional, even if you have a rough go of things. This will leave a positive final impression in the minds of others, which could help you out down the road with references. Here are some things you should include in your employee leaving, farewell message.

Thank you: This can be directed to everyone in general, but you can include specific people to address in your employee leaving, farewell message. This is especially important if you are going on good terms, after a long run with the company. Be sure to thank all the people that helped you get ahead at work and let them know you appreciated all the help they gave you. If you choose to address specific people in a mass email, it's a good idea to include a broad, general statement as well, so you don't leave anyone out in your employee leaving, farewell message.

Future plans: As you write your employee leaving, farewell message, you may want to include a brief blurb about what you are doing in the future. "I plan to enjoy my retirement and spend my days fishing" or something similar could be used. If you are quitting your job for a new position, it's okay to mention it, but you should be sure you don't come off in the wrong way. Don't belittle the position you were in, or make it sound like your next job is far better than your current one. This could lead to hurt feelings in your employee leaving, farewell message.

Why you are going, tactfully: As long as you can do it professionally, it's okay to explain why you are quitting in your employee leaving, farewell message. This could be retirement, relocation, or virtually any other reason. If you are quitting due to a conflict with others, or for any unpleasant reason, you may want to either omit this portion, or be sure to tiptoe around a bit with your words. Taking shots at others in your employee leaving, farewell message, will not gain you any friends. Construct the letter in a professional manner.

Describe your feelings: When you construct your employee leaving, farewell message to your coworkers and bosses, it's okay to describe your feelings. "I'm very sad to leave company X, but I'm excited about retirement and looking forward to time with my wife." If you send a letter or email like this one to your coworkers or bosses, you will get your point across. If you have sour feeling about the departure, it may be best to avoid this one, or dress it up a bit. Once again, taking shots at others in your employee leaving, farewell message will not help your cause in any manner.

Recall specific events: It's okay to reference specific events or memories from your career, even if many of the newer employees will not entirely understand what you are referring to. If you decide to go this route, stick to events and memories that were funny, shocking, or just plain fun, but not anything sour in nature. If you have worked at the same company for many years there's a great chance you have many memories to share with others. "I remember the early days, when there was just 5 of us working in the office." There's nothing wrong with making references like this in your employee leaving, farewell message to your coworkers or others.

Share contact information: In many cases it's appropriate to leave contact information for your friends and teammates in your employee leaving, farewell message. There is nothing wrong with this in most cases. Of course, you should only do this if you actually want to have a continued relationship with your former coworkers and bosses. This part is really up to you, but it certainly could be included in your employee leaving, farewell message.

Things to omit:

A well constructed employee leaving, farewell message will be professional and courteous. It's really important to make sure you don't overstep your bounds, or take shots at others on your way out the door. There are some things you should not include in your employee leaving, farewell message.

Hard feelings: Don't cite reasons for quitting that can cause hard feelings. "I must quit since my new boss, Jim, doesn't think I know what I'm doing." This is quite unprofessional to say the least and will not help you out. Even those that really liked you on the job could have a change of opinion if you write something like this in your employee leaving, farewell message. These emails are no fun to read.

Bragging: Don't come across like a pompous jerk in your employee leaving, farewell message to your coworkers or bosses. If you were good at your job, others will already know it. If you will be making tons more money, keep it to yourself.

Being pushed out: If you were on the verge of termination or you were asked to resign, you shouldn't include this from your employee leaving, farewell message to your coworkers or bosses. This will not make a good final impression to anyone.

Hopefully you have a good idea what you write in your email or letter when you construct your employee leaving, farewell message at your job. It's really important to make a good final impression.

Fellow Info Barrel writer, x3xsolxdierx3x and I, created this 6-book course over 5 months!...We launched it on Warrior Forum at a VERY highly discounted rate...This price will not last much longer. You can see it here.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

(This banner currently links to the highly discounted Warrior Forum thread!)


Advertisement
Advertisement

Comments

Jul 10, 2010 10:34am
x3xsolxdierx3x
This article gives some great tips....Professionalism should definitely still be maintained no matter what the circumstances of one's leaving a job....
Add a new comment - No HTML
You must be logged in and verified to post a comment. Please log in or sign up to comment.

Media

Explore InfoBarrel

Auto Business & Money Entertainment Environment Health History Home & Garden InfoBarrel University Lifestyle Sports Technology Travel & Places
© Copyright 2008 - 2016 by Hinzie Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap

Follow IB Business & Money