Forgot your password?

Employee Leaving - Farewell Message

By Edited Jan 9, 2016 2 6

Employee Leaving Farewell Message
As an employing leaving, farewell message composition can be difficult. Giving your boss a 2 week notice is common courtesy, and whether you are choosing to pursue a different career, or are simply looking for a new working environment, quitting while remaining on good terms with everyone at your company is key. Constructive termination of your employment will keep you from burning bridges that may turn out to be quite valuable in the future. Here are some tips for writing a courteous "goodbye" letter to your employer.

Clear up any confusion. Clearly state your reasoning for quitting in the letter. You do not need to be overly harsh, but constructive criticism is always welcome in business. The last thing a manager wants to see is an employee leaving. Farewell message delivery upon your departure from the company will help clarify what your reasoning is for leaving your current position, and will help the manager understand how he or she can improve the working conditions of the company (if those are part of your reasoning). This will not only leave you satisfied (with a chance to get everything off of your chest), but will also provide the company with valuable feedback.

Include things that you liked about your job. This is key. When an employee is leaving, a farewell message can quickly turn into an unorganized list of negative aspects related to his or her experience at the company. This can leave you looking extremely pessimistic. Instead of focusing only on the negatives, show your employer that there are also enjoyable characteristics related to the position. This will cause your previous employer to take your considerations more seriously, and will maintain your reputation as a professional.

Do not let your emotions get the best of you. In the heat of the moment, it is easy to decide that you will berate your boss for treating you horribly and never listening to your suggestions. This will make you look foolish and immature, especially when quitting your job. Instead of acting upon your emotions, take a few days to thoroughly examine and edit your 2 week notice on paper. If your composition is high quality and presents good points, the boss will not simply view you as another employee leaving. A farewell message that is highly structured and well put together will receive more recognition than a last minute list of concerns that is hastily thrown together.

Give your employer the letter in person. Many people dread the idea of quitting in person; however, you will feel much better after the fact, and quitting in person allows for many unresolved issues to be discussed. In large companies, it is highly likely that an employee is leaving every day. Providing a farewell message in association with your one-on-one meeting will allow your boss to reference something in writing after you leave. This is extremely important if you hope to improve the conditions of your position for whoever will hold it next.

Thank your boss for the opportunity to work with the company. This can be hard to do, but you are the employee leaving. If your farewell letter and your time together discussing your reasoning for leaving the company also focus on your appreciation of the opportunities and compensation that you received during your employment, it will be much easier to leave the business looking like the "good guy". It is always tempting to laugh and emphasize that you feel as though you wasted your time, but taking the high road is much more honorable (and won't come back to bite you).

As an employee, leaving your company can be difficult. Combining a farewell message with a one-on-one meeting is the most effective way to communicate with your employer, and quit your current job on good terms with everyone at the company.



Jul 30, 2010 1:41pm
great tips! Leaving on good terms is always a good thing. Great article!
Aug 5, 2010 11:03am
I think that your are absolutely right and I was faced with this same obstacle earlier this year. A job I had been out for 15 + years. My new boss and I didn't click. I liked her, but she didn't like me. I had a lot of pull because of my seniority and I think that this intimidated her. I left with a four week notice and handled just as you explained above. It was hard, but that is what being an adult entail sometimes. Great article.
Aug 19, 2010 7:32am
Yeah, good ideas, sometimes difficult to do, but you never know when you could be working with some of the same people again, so keep things on good terms.
Apr 12, 2011 7:13pm
Great tips, never burn bridges no matter how much you would like to - it may come back to bite you in the rear. Great article
Apr 15, 2011 5:01pm
Excellent tips, yes i agree with you on not burning bridges very important.
Jun 5, 2011 10:27am
Yes, good to keep in good terms, you never know if they will be useful in the future.
Add a new comment - No HTML
You must be logged in and verified to post a comment. Please log in or sign up to comment.

Explore InfoBarrel

Auto Business & Money Entertainment Environment Health History Home & Garden InfoBarrel University Lifestyle Sports Technology Travel & Places
© Copyright 2008 - 2016 by Hinzie Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap

Follow IB Business & Money