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Get Out of the Doctors Office and Put Your Nose in a Book!

By Edited Apr 10, 2016 0 0

When I was growing up I had a terrible case of not being able to control myself, "ants in my pants" was the saying most used to describe me. My teachers and some doctors told my mom to put me on a drug to help with ADHD, claiming that it will calm me down and help me in school. My mom refused and I turned out to be a smart, patient, intelligent student without the use of a drug to help me focus. I grew out of the "ants in my pants" stage by maturing throughout the years. In college, most students, including myself, have trouble focusing and I think that the uses of ADHD prescription drugs have been misused. It seems that the use of "focus drugs" or an ADHD prescription drug has inflated to an epidemic in college. Even though experts diagnose students in the U.S. every year, many doctors over diagnose those students, causing over-medication for students who are not seriously affiliated with the problem of ADHD.

Going to a doctor to try and get a prescription for ADHD drugs is a new thing with college students. I recently went online and found a website that states the questions the doctor will ask and how the patient should answer them to trick the doctor into believing they are suffering from ADHD. These questions include:

Childhood & School

Q: How did you perform in grade school?

A: Average to below average. Dependant on tutors just to keep up.

Q: Any behavioral problems?

A: Yes. Talking in class. (Add frequent parent teacher conferences to address school performance for extra ADD points.)

Q: How did you do on lectures in college?

A: Poorly. Trouble attending big lectures. Frequently zoning out, doodling and conversing with classmates. (For extra points, mention that you were only accepted into a community college.)

Q: How did you perform on college exams?

A: Poorly. Frequently cheated to pass. (For a bigger punch, mention periodic self medicating with Sudafed – an over the counter stimulant.) (Magomedov)

These questions are from a website to try and help push the idea that a student suffers from ADHD. I think this is immoral and this drug is being used in the wrong way. Students are using this to try to do better on exams and be able to retain more information at a time. I understand that college courses can be very difficult to complete, but instead of complaining about how hard the course is, break study time to about 30 minutes a day instead of waiting till the night before to try and cram everything into the brain. This will also cut down on the feeling to need the prescription drug when the college student is not seriously afflicted with ADHD.

This also correlates to me because I was considered to have ADHD as a child and now that I have grown out of that stage in life I am attempting to complete a biomedical degree in college. My next step is Medical school and I did all of this without the need to have a prescription drug for a fake symptom that I do not have. I think that students today just plainly do not want to put the work needed to get the grade in the class. I have friends who take these prescriptions to be able to stay awake during class because they stayed up all night talking on facebook instead of sleeping, some friends take these prescriptions because they feel that they can only learn while on them, and the worst condition is some friends take these prescription drugs to curb appetites to lose weight. When someone who is not prescribed ADHD medicine consumes a dose, they run the risk of hurting themselves and even running into trouble. The misuse of a prescription could lead to an allergic attack without consulting a doctor because these allergies may be unknown to the user. When someone takes or shares a prescription drug with friends it is actually breaking the law. It is not worth the risk of hurting the body or breaking the law to take prescriptions when they are not intended for everyone's use.

ADHD can be profound in many children and adults and prescription drugs have been found to help significantly. With the right steps these drugs can be controlled and safely prescribed to those who are truly in need. However, I do not agree with students or adults misusing the prescription for motivation to clean around the house or using the prescription off and on when needed. Some people claim that when on these drugs they feel the ability to "get more done" in a shorten amount of time. This is not what the intent of the prescription is used for. I think that many doctors over diagnose students many times because they hear what they have been trained to look for, and just assume the person in the doctor's office would not lie to them. I am not saying that doctors are easily fooled, but I do think that they have a tendency to hear what the patient is saying and are quick to treat the problem with a prescription.

I think that doctors over diagnosing students with ADHD has become a major problem in our society today. I think that this problem could be avoided with a bit of hard work, but the problem with our society is that everything is being simplified to be easier and taking less time to complete. This fits right in with our problem of students taking a pill to learn more in a shorten amount of time, when in all reality students just need to spend more time in the books and not in their doctors office.

Works cited


ADD/ADHD. EXILE CLASSIC. 29 JUNE 2006. Web. 29 October 2010.



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