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Grow Roses - Bare Roots or Container

By Edited Feb 20, 2014 1 1

Many people love to grow roses. They represent beauty and undying love. Roses are very fragrant flowers, and cut roses make wonderful flower arrangements. Sometimes growing roses can be a difficult task. Deciding which is better to plant between bare root or container roses is an individual choice, however most prefer bare roots to container roses for many reasons. One of the most important differences is that bare roots are basically roots that are not adhered together by soil. By not being bound together, the roots can be arranged to grow outward. This can allow for the initial root system to be established much quicker. Bare root roses are great for planting in the early spring or fall during the optimal growing season.

Container roses do not shock as easily during the transplanting process. These types of roses can be planted anytime of the year. Because the root system is semi-established, container roses can be planted in the summer as well as the winter. Buy container roses that have blooms gives you a sense of how the roses will look, but this is not always the best thing for optimal results. This is because the energy of the plant is focused on supplying the blooms instead of the establishment of a healthy root system. The root system is the vital part of the plants outcome.

Bare Root Roses
When preparing bare root roses for planting soak the roots in water with a rooting hormone for a few hours or overnight. Do not leave them longer than this. While your roots are soaking in the water prepare the planting hole. Dig a spot that is at least two feet deep and twenty inches wide. An extra tip is to dig six inches deeper and fill this area in with aged manure and cover with soil. This will give the roots nutrients after establishing it’s root system. Place rose bush in the hole, but shorten the roots slightly before you do and be sure to remove any diseased or damaged roots. Make sure that the bud union is a couple of inches below ground level for zone 6 and level with the ground for zones seven and above. Place the plant on a small mound of dirt in the hole and radiate the roots out away from the plant. Gently backfill the hole with amended soil if necessary depending on the condition of the removed soil, and pour water down over backfill. Backfill even more soil and the plant is located at the correct position depending upon the zone climate in your area. Gentle press out the air bubbles from soil with hands instead of pressing down on them with your feet as not to injure the delicate roots. Water deeply at least twice a week

When planting container roses that have blooms go ahead and shorten the stems in order for the root system to develop. Take the cut flowers and place them in a vase. Remember to water deeply and you should be pleased with the results.



Mar 30, 2011 3:21pm
Thank you pwarlick for this article. I am striving to transplant heirloom roses as we speak. Very informative.
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