Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://akshaypharmd.blogspot.com/2012/04/disorders-of-platelets-and-focus-on-von.htmlOne of the most elegant creations of nature is blood clotting. But like most creations, it has its own flaws. Disorders of hemostasis cover two opposite poles, one condition is caused by undesirable clot formation, another condition is caused by the inability to produce clot and lastly a condition that involves both.
 
Thromboembolic Conditions
 Thromboembolic Conditions - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://maxshouse.com/arterial_thromboembolism.htm
Hemostasis in the wrong place does happen sometimes, despite all installed mechanisms of the body to regulate the process. A thrombus is a clot that persists and develops even when there is no damage done to the blood vessels. As clot continues to form, the thrombus increase in size, to a point where it can actually impede the flow of blood. Once the certain group of tissues are not sufficiently supplied with oxygen, that group of tissue will soon die. A famous example for this condition is coronary thrombosis. 
 
If for some reason the thrombus detaches itself from the vessel wall and floats freely in the blood stream, it is now called an embolus. In essence, an embolus poses no threat as if floats in the bloodstream. However, once an embolus encounters a vessel that is too narrow for it to pass through, then it becomes an embolism, an emboli blocking a blood vessel. 
 
Conditions such as atherosclerosis or inflammation can predispose to thromboembolic disease by giving the platelets a base to start clotting. Slow movement of blood also presents a problem since it give the clotting factors a chance to accumulate, thereby permitting clot formation.
 
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
 Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://www.ocbmedia.com/meningitis/pathophysiology.php
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation or DIC is a special type of hemostasis disorder. In this condition, widespread clotting occurs in undamaged blood vessels and leaves the residual blood unable to clot. What manifests is a blockage in blood flow and later followed by a severe bleeding episode. 
 
Bleeding Disorders
 Bleeding Disorders - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dermatophagia.jpg
Anything that hampers the ability of the blood to form clots results in abnormal bleeding episodes. Thrombocytopenia is a classic example of a bleeding disorder.
 
Thrombocytopenia
 Thrombocytopenia - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edema_Hands_01.jpg
Small vessels all over the body spontaneously bleed because of thrombocytopenia. The appearance of petechiae indicates spontaneous bleeding. Thrombocytopenia arises from any condition that destroys or suppresses the bone marrow. A temporary solution to this problem is the transfusion of concentrated platelets.
 
Impaired Liver Function
 Impaired Liver Function - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://www.wellsphere.com/wellpage/pulmonary-function-test-interpreting-abnormal
The liver is the source of the usual supply of procoagulants. If it is unable to perform its task, abnormal and often severe bleeding episodes occur. The cause why the liver fails to perform its function ranges from a simple deficiency in Vitamin K to a more serious total impairment of liver functions. 
 
Vitamin K is needed by the liver in order to create or synthesize clotting factors. Since vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, impaired ability to absorb fat by the body can lead to vitamin K deficiency which predisposing a person to bleeding disorders.
 
HemophiliasHemophilias - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://www.pathguy.com/lectures/coag.htm
 
The word hemophilia is referring to several hereditary bleeding disorders. Hemophilia A or sometimes known as classical hemophilia is a condition arising from a deficiency of clotting factor VIII or antihemophilic factor. Hemophilia B is due to deficiency in clotting factov IX. Both hemophilias only occur in male. A third type of hemophilia, hemophilia C is seen to occur in both sexes and is due to lack of clotting factor IX.
Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://akshaypharmd.blogspot.com/2012/04/disorders-of-platelets-and-focus-on-von.htmlOne of the most elegant creations of nature is blood clotting. But like most creations, it has its own flaws. Disorders of hemostasis cover two opposite poles, one condition is caused by undesirable clot formation, another condition is caused by the inability to produce clot and lastly a condition that involves both.
 
Thromboembolic Conditions
 Thromboembolic Conditions - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://maxshouse.com/arterial_thromboembolism.htm
Hemostasis in the wrong place does happen sometimes, despite all installed mechanisms of the body to regulate the process. A thrombus is a clot that persists and develops even when there is no damage done to the blood vessels. As clot continues to form, the thrombus increase in size, to a point where it can actually impede the flow of blood. Once the certain group of tissues are not sufficiently supplied with oxygen, that group of tissue will soon die. A famous example for this condition is coronary thrombosis. 
 
If for some reason the thrombus detaches itself from the vessel wall and floats freely in the blood stream, it is now called an embolus. In essence, an embolus poses no threat as if floats in the bloodstream. However, once an embolus encounters a vessel that is too narrow for it to pass through, then it becomes an embolism, an emboli blocking a blood vessel. 
 
Conditions such as atherosclerosis or inflammation can predispose to thromboembolic disease by giving the platelets a base to start clotting. Slow movement of blood also presents a problem since it give the clotting factors a chance to accumulate, thereby permitting clot formation.
 
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
 Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://www.ocbmedia.com/meningitis/pathophysiology.php
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation or DIC is a special type of hemostasis disorder. In this condition, widespread clotting occurs in undamaged blood vessels and leaves the residual blood unable to clot. What manifests is a blockage in blood flow and later followed by a severe bleeding episode. 
 
Bleeding Disorders
 Bleeding Disorders - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dermatophagia.jpg
Anything that hampers the ability of the blood to form clots results in abnormal bleeding episodes. Thrombocytopenia is a classic example of a bleeding disorder.
 
Thrombocytopenia
 Thrombocytopenia - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edema_Hands_01.jpg
Small vessels all over the body spontaneously bleed because of thrombocytopenia. The appearance of petechiae indicates spontaneous bleeding. Thrombocytopenia arises from any condition that destroys or suppresses the bone marrow. A temporary solution to this problem is the transfusion of concentrated platelets.
 
Impaired Liver Function
 Impaired Liver Function - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://www.wellsphere.com/wellpage/pulmonary-function-test-interpreting-abnormal
The liver is the source of the usual supply of procoagulants. If it is unable to perform its task, abnormal and often severe bleeding episodes occur. The cause why the liver fails to perform its function ranges from a simple deficiency in Vitamin K to a more serious total impairment of liver functions. 
 
Vitamin K is needed by the liver in order to create or synthesize clotting factors. Since vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, impaired ability to absorb fat by the body can lead to vitamin K deficiency which predisposing a person to bleeding disorders.
 
HemophiliasHemophilias - Hemostasis DisordersCredit: http://www.pathguy.com/lectures/coag.htm
 
The word hemophilia is referring to several hereditary bleeding disorders. Hemophilia A or sometimes known as classical hemophilia is a condition arising from a deficiency of clotting factor VIII or antihemophilic factor. Hemophilia B is due to deficiency in clotting factov IX. Both hemophilias only occur in male. A third type of hemophilia, hemophilia C is seen to occur in both sexes and is due to lack of clotting factor IX.