While it can’t be said that there are rabbit proof herbs, there are some herbs rabbits won’t eat-usually. The more competition there is for food, the more likely the local rabbit population will invade your landscape. A female rabbit can produce three or four litters every year. The new rabbits usually make their appearance from early spring until fall. That’s a lot of new rabbits running around. But, have heart, there are some rabbit resistant herbs.

Catmint
Rather than grow rabbit resistant herbs like regular catmint, try Walker’s Low Catmint (Nepeta faassenii 'Walkers Low'). This variety is also called Faassen’s Catmint or Ornamental Catmint. Hardy in the United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) zones 4a through 9b, this perennial thrives in full sun but is also happy in areas that receive some evening shade. It tolerates most soil types as long as they are well-draining soils. The fast growing, low-maintenance herb doesn’t require a lot of water and is heat and drought resistant. With a low growing, mounding growth habit, Walker’s Low catmint can grow to a height of 1 foot with a spread of 2 feet. The aromatic herb has silvery-grey foliage and blue blooms. The blooms attract butterflies and hummingbirds from spring until fall. It is one of the rabbit resistant herbs that prefers soil with a pH level ranging from 6 to 8.

Mint(86914)Credit: morgueFile.com: by prairiebeat


Paprika Yarrow
Paprika Yarrow (Achillea millefolium 'Paprika') sounds like it would be one of the truly rabbit proof herbs, but don’t let the spicy name fool you. While it might be one of the herbs rabbits don’t eat, the colorful name refers to the vivid red blooms this herb produces from spring until fall. It is also known as Red Yarrow, Milfoil, Sanguinary, Thousandleaf, Staunchweed and Soldier’s Woundwort. OK, the last two names really make this plant sound like one of the rabbit proof herbs. Hardy in USDA zones 3a through 8b, this perennial thrives in full sun. It tolerates most soil types as long as they are well-draining soils. The moderately growing, low-maintenance herb doesn’t require a lot of water and is heat and drought resistant. It has a clumping, yet spreading, growth habit that can reach up to 2 feet in height and have a similar spread. The foliage is a medium green shade and it produces deep red flowers with yellow centers. The bloom attract butterflies. Paprika yarrow prefers soils with a pH level ranging from 5.5 to 6.5.

Red-YarrowCredit: morgueFile.com: by missyredboots


Lavender
Lavender is one of the herbs rabbits won’t eat. The most common lavenders are French Lavender and Spanish Lavender. Hardy in USDA zones 8a through 11, this perennial should be grown as an annual or protected throughout the winter months. It performs best in full sun but is also happy in areas that receive dappled shade. It tolerates most soil types as long as they are well-draining soils. The fast growing, low-maintenance herb doesn’t require a lot of water and tolerates heat, drought and salt. With a dense, spreading growth habit, lavender can grow to a height of 3 feet with a spread of 6 feet. The foliage of these herbs rabbits won’t eat is silvery-grey and it produces fragrant lavender to purple blooms. The blooms attract butterflies and hummingbirds in spring. It prefers soil with a pH level ranging from 6 to 7.5.

Lavender(86917)Credit: morgueFile.com: by karpati


Sweet Woodruff
Sweet Woodruff (Galium odoratum), also called Our Lady’s Lace or Sweetscented Bedstraw, is one of the perennial rabbit resistant herbs hardy in USDA zones 4a through 8b. It thrives in full shade but tolerates dappled shade or areas that receive some morning sun and evening shade. It requires sandy, or loamy, soils that do not drain well. It requires a lot of water but very little other care and has a moderate growth rate. This deer resistant herb grows to a height of 1 foot and has a similar width. It has fragrant, dark-green foliage and produces white flowers early in the summer. It needs soils with a pH level ranging from 5.5 to 7.5.

Sweet-WoodruffCredit: morgueFile.com: by gracey


Chives
Chives (Allium schnoenoprasum) sounds like they should be considered one of the rabbit proof herbs, but they aren’t truly rabbit proof. This perennial herb is hardy in USDA zones 5a through 8b. The low-maintenance herb grows in most soil types as long as they are well-draining and located in full sun. It’s a shame it can’t be considered one of the rabbit proof herbs because it is so easy to grow, even heat and drought tolerant. The low-maintenance herb has a clumping growth habit and can grow up to 1 foot in height and 2 feet in width. Chives have dark-green foliage and produce purple flowers during the spring that attract butterflies. It prefers soils with a pH level ranging from 6 to 8.

Chives(86918)Credit: morgueFile.com: by gracey


Mints
The various mints (Mentha spp) count amongst the herbs deer won’t eat. To make life more interesting, grow chocolate mint (Mentha piperita ‘Chocolate’). Hardy in USDA zones 4a through 11, this perennial herb actually holds it’s own in whatever zone it decides to grow. Grow it in a shady area or one that receives morning sun and evening shade. Chocolate mint is one of the herbs rabbits won’t eat that grow rapidly. It can become invasive but is heat and drought tolerant. A single plant can grow up to 2-feet tall and 4-feet wide. It tolerates all soil types as long as they are moderately-draining to well-draining. The fragrant foliage is dark green. Butterflies are attracted to the soft purple flowers during the summer. This is one of the herbs rabbit won’t eat that require soil pH levels ranging from 6 to 7.

MintsCredit: morgueFile.com: by xandert

Commonly grown rabbit resistant herbs include rosemary, oregano and sage. It sounds like lemon thyme and lemon balm might be rabbit proof herbs, but they are typically only among the herbs rabbits won’t eat if the rabbits don’t feel pressured due to overpopulation or poor growing conditions. Herbs are inexpensive, so it wouldn’t hurt to try out a few varieties to determine which plants work best in your yard. Rabbits have been known to leave plants alone in one yard, but devour the exact same plants in the neighbor’s yard.