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How Schools Deal With Student Deaths?

By Edited Feb 13, 2014 0 0

Whether the death of a high school student was the result of a student massacre, a police shooting, or a suicide, when that student dies, there is a loss.  This is not pleasant.  

Highmark Caring place makes consultations and educational presentations available for professionals that work with children in the community.   There is not charge for this service according to Terese , Director of Highmark Caring Place.   In addition, Highmark Caring Place has a support peer group to help grieving children and their adult guardians.

When a high school student dies, there are many students and families affected by the loss.

 

I had a close friend whose student died in his elementary school room of a mass heart attack.  No one expects an elementary child to die from a sudden heart attack.   This happened during class session.   Can you imagine the shock for all the students that were in that classroom?   

 
Grieving students need to feel comfortable with whom they talk.   In May 2011, ABC 7 news article “Student killed Wednesday was responsible, well-liked,” they stated that several grief counselors were available at Castle wood campus to help grieving students and staff.    Can you imagine being gunned down?   That is what happened to a   17-year-old teen   near Castle wood Leadership Preparatory High School.   The student was to graduate in several weeks.   Incidents like this are quite shocking to all.


Photo credit: anitapatterson from morguefile.com

No one can imagine having his or her child murdered.   In the article “Helping teens with grief,” Web MD gives a few tips to helping teens with grief:   

1.   Know what is normal for your teen’s age group.

2.  Listen and watch for opportunities to help.

3.  Don’t force a teen to talk about their feelings.  

4.  When a teen wants to talk, make time to listen.

 I believe listening is a key part.   When you listen to a teen, they are able to express some of the feelings that they are feeling.  

Sometimes teens may just need to cry.  Crying is a healthy outlet for the pain and sadness that they experience.  In fact crying is healthy for all ages that are experiencing any type of grief.  


During a child’s lifetime, they may experience the loss of a parent or relative.   Experiencing the loss of another peer is devastating.   What are your thoughts on this?[3228][3229][3230]

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Bibliography

  1. Terese Vorscheck, Director, Highmark Caring Place "Highmark Caring Place remembers 9/11 and the toll death taken on children every day, by." http://teacher.scholastic.com. 9/9/2011. 9/9/2011 <Web >
  2. East Bay News "Student killed Wednesday was responsible, well-liked." ABC7 News. 26/5/2011. 26/5/2011 <Web >
  3. By Kathleen Romito, MD, Family Medicine, and Sidney Zisook MD, Psychiatry "Helping teens with grief." WebMD.com. 7/12/2009. 7/12/2009 <Web >

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