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How To Restore the Smell to a Cedar Closet

By Edited May 13, 2016 2 2

Cedar-closets have a wonderful, distinct smell that many homeowners and prospective homebuyers find very appealing. A closet should not only house your clothes, but the closet should also protect your clothes. Your Grandma was right -- Cedar helps to keep fabric-eating bugs from attacking your clothing, linens and other textiles. Cedar has no chemicals added; its natural aroma deters insects and keeps them from chewing holes through fabrics. Cedar is also mildew, mold and rot resistant, making it a very wise choice for a closet lining. Cedar has a warm and inviting red color with a close grain. Over time, some cedar loses its scent. Many people look to revive it smell, but do not know what to do to bring it back.

 Restoring it-Scent

Vacuum it-closet from the ceiling to the floor. Use an upholstery brush attached to a vacuum cleaner hose to remove all dust from the wood surface.

Place a sheet of 320-grit sandpaper around a padded sanding block. Start at the top of the closet and lightly sand it. Make sure you sand in the same direction as the wood grain. Sanding against the grain will cause it to look fuzzy and feel rough. You can use 320-grit sandpaper in an orbital palm sander, if you use a very light touch when sanding. Sanding by hand, although harder and more time consuming provides more control over the amount of cedar removed from the surface. You on want to sand off the topmost layer only.

Vacuum the closet a second time to remove small bits of cedar saw dust from the walls and floor. If you plan on using it sawdust later, sweep it up and set it aside.

Wipe it surface with a tack rag, starting at the top of the closet and working your way down toward the floor to pick up small pieces of dust from sanding.

Scoop out 2 tablespoons of paste furniture wax and place it into a small glass, microwave-safe bowl. Put the wax in the microwave for about 20 second to make it warm and pliable. You can also place the wax in a double boiler to soften it.

Mix 24 to 26 drops of cedar essential oil into the paste wax. Blend very well with a popsicle stick. Use only a high quality essential oil to gain the most scent and the most benefit. If you would like to add more cedar aroma to the closet, increase the amount of cedar oil.

Dip a microfiber cloth or lint free, well worn flannel rag into the mixture of oil and wax.

Spread the wax over it closet lining, making small circular motions as you apply the scented wax. Wait for the wax to turn a hazy, white color, indicating it is dry. Rub the dull, waxy residue off the surface with a microfiber cloth or clean, well worn flannel rag. When it closet loses its scent, repeat the process. Paste wax may darken the color of it. Test the wax on a hidden area of the closet before using over a large surface area.

If you do not want to take the chance of darkening it, dip the microfiber rag or well worn flannel rag into cedar essential oil and dab it on hidden areas of the closet such as above the door or at the floor line. Remove the base molding from the inside of the closet. Rub cedar oil into it along the floor and then reattach the molding.

Condsider saving it-saw dust and mixing it with cedar essential oil for a more powerful scent. Place the sawdust in a small jar and store it in kitchen cabinets, pantries or on a high, out of the way corner of a shelf. it aroma works to keep insects away from foods, linens and textiles, while remaining non toxic.

If you would like to have a cedar lined closet, consider turning any closet in your home into a wonderfully scented cedar closet.



Nov 12, 2011 12:17am
This is interesting. Who knew you could rejuvenate cedar closets smell? I have several cedar boxes around the house that I frequently smell, reminds me of my childhood in Michigan.
Nov 13, 2011 3:28pm
Great tips. I didn't know that cedar could be made to smell good again. Next project for hubby, cedar closet and 2 cedar trucks. I thank you, not sure if he will..LOL.
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