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How To Spot Security Alerts That Are Fake

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 0 0

Thieves have been using security alerts that are fake more frequently as a way to steal people's personal information. There are several ways to spot security alerts that are fake and this article will guide you on how to do it.

Things You Will Need

To follow the guidelines listed in this article on how to spot security alerts that are fake.

Step 1

security alerts
The first step to spotting security alerts that are fake is when you are contacted by phone and asked to give out your personal information to "verify an account". Any company who has sensitive information on you(i.e. your bank, insurance company etc.) would not need to call you to verify that information as they already have it. If someone calls you claiming they need your personal information for any reason ask them for their name and phone number and tell them you will call them back regarding the security alert. Then go to the companies web site the person claims they are calling from and call the 800 number listed on the website. This way you can verify if the company really was calling you about legitimate security alerts, and if not you can report the incident to them.

Step 2

The second step to spotting security alerts that are fake is to look at the punctuation and spelling in any security alert e-mail that is sent to you. Many times these fraudulent security alert e-mails have obvious spelling and grammatical errors in them. If you get an e-mail claiming there was a security breach on your account and instructing you to follow a link in the e-mail(never click on these links or enter any personal information) check for spelling and grammatical mistakes as this is a dead give away the security alert is fraudulent.

Step 3

security alert
The third step to spotting security alerts that are fake is to report any suspicious security alert e-mails that you receive. Many companies have e-mail addresses set up where you can forward these security alerts. They are typically spoof@(insert the company).com. If the company does not have this commonly used e-mail address set up then contact the company to find out where you can forward the e-mail.

Tips & Warnings



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