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How to Build a Bird Trap

By Edited Feb 7, 2014 0 1

How to Build a Bird Trap

This essay will tell you how to build a bird trap. But why would one want to do that, you may ask? Well, perhaps you are starving and birds are the only source of food. But there are other reasons. When I was a boy I used to build bird traps, not to harm the birds, but to study them. I was particularly interested in blue jays and how they were put together. I would examine them and then let them go. So, I needed a bird trap.

Being from the City, I did not know the first thing about bird traps, nor how to make them. I just had this desire to see the birds close up. But my first idea about how to build a bird trap was naive and inefficient. The idea was this: You get a box, a crate of some sort and you prop it up on one side with a stick and you attach a string to the stick and you let out the string until you find a hiding place and you can still see the box up ahead. By the way, you have put some food under the box, so that when the bird goes under the open box to get the food, you will be able to pull the supporting stick out and the box will fall, trapping the bird.

Building a Sophisticated Bird Trap

"No, No, No," said my country cousin. "That is no way to build a bird trap. Look, you will be waiting all day in hope that the bird will show up and go under your trap. But the bird probably sees you by following the string it surely will see. Do you think the bird is stupid? And also, you will have to stay in this uncomfortable position until by chance you get a bird that hungry enough to take the bait. There is a much better way. I will show you how to build a bird trap that does not require you to stay hidden all day and that does not require you to jerk a string when you have detected a bird under your box. Here is what you can do." First you want not a box but a cage you can see into. You can make one of these devices by cutting up apple boxes and resetting the slats so that they form a pyramid of crossed slats. This way you can see into it and it is easy to tell if a bird is inside. If you return to your trap and the lid is down, there is a possibility that the bird escaped just before the trap closed, but now you can see into the trap and you will easily see the bird if it is there.

And now we come to my main point. To make a good bird trap you will need a good trigger. The trigger will enable you to catch a bird when you are not even present. You could be ten miles away and still catch a bird and when you returned, you would see the bird still in its trap. So it is a good idea to make a good trigger. How is this done?. You will need three slender slats of wood, one planted perpendicular to the ground and supporting the edge of the trap, but supporting an elongated slat that runs the length of the trap, The tip of the elongated slat is resting on the edge of the trap itself. Now you have a kind of spring. The long slat is now attached to a third slat and the whole system looks like a figure FOUR. Here is the idea. When the bird looks into the trap it sees food, but the food is not on the ground; it is on the elongated slat that extends the length of the trap. Easy going. And there are no human beings around. No suspicious strings attached to a box. So, the bird goes under the trap covering and pecks the food on the trigger and the trigger gives way and the top of the trap falls and the bird is inside.

Releasing the Birds from the Bird Trap

Now, you can't very well just lift the top of the bird trap to retrieve your prey; you must carefully did a hole to the side of the trap so that you can reach under the trap and seize the bird. If you are interested in going after Blue Jays, you had better have some hefty gloves around because if you don't you are going to be missing some flesh even if you are lucky enough to snare your bird. And so there, it is...step by step instructions on how to build a bird trap. The trigger is the main element in the process and remember it has three components: the elongated stick on which the food is placed, the support stick to which the elongated stick is attached, and the spring stick which supports the weight of the crate or top. You can use small notches to give some security to the FOUR pattern, but don't make the notches too deep because this may prevent the system from collapsing even if the bird does peck the food from the elongated stick.

If you get confused on how the sticks are attached, just think of the number four and lay out the pattern of four on a floor, noting how the various sizes fit together. You can temporarily test the trigger by setting it up in stages and then putting in the notches to give it stability. It is not a good idea to finalize the set up until you have tried and tested many patterns. You will want to judge how close the elongated stick is to the ground, how much spring is required in the two supporting sticks and how stable the base stick will be. If you get confused, you can always g

And now we come to my main point. To make a good bird trap you will need a good trigger. The trigger will enable you to catch a bird when you are not even present. You could be ten miles away and still catch a bird and when you returned, you would see the bird still in its trap. So it is a good idea to make a good trigger. How is this done?. You will need three slender slats of wood, one planted perpendicular to the ground and supporting the edge of the trap, but supporting an elongated slat that runs the length of the trap, The tip of the elongated slat is resting on the edge of the trap itself. Now you have a kind of spring. The long slat is now attached to a third slat and the whole system looks like a figure FOUR. Here is the idea. When the bird looks into the trap it sees food, but the food is not on the ground; it is on the elongated slat that extends the length of the trap. Easy going. And there are no human beings around. No suspicious strings attached to a box. So, the bird goes under the trap covering and pecks the food on the trigger and the trigger gives way and the top of the trap falls and the bird is inside.

Releasing the Birds from the Bird Trap

Now, you can't very well just lift the top of the bird trap to retrieve your prey; you must carefully did a hole to the side of the trap so that you can reach under the trap and seize the bird. If you are interested in going after Blue Jays, you had better have some hefty gloves around because if you don't you are going to be missing some flesh even if you are lucky enough to snare your bird. And so there, it is...step by step instructions on how to build a bird trap. The trigger is the main element in the process and remember it has three components: the elongated stick on which the food is placed, the support stick to which the elongated stick is attached, and the spring stick which supports the weight of the crate or top. You can use small notches to give some security to the FOUR pattern, but don't make the notches too deep because this may prevent the system from collapsing even if the bird does peck the food from the elongated stick.

If you get confused on how the sticks are attached, just think of the number four and lay out the pattern of four on a floor, noting how the various sizes fit together. You can temporarily test the trigger by setting it up in stages and then putting in the notches to give it stability. It is not a good idea to finalize the set up until you have tried and tested many patterns. You will want to judge how close the elongated stick is to the ground, how much spring is required in the two supporting sticks and how stable the base stick will be. If you get confused, you can always go back to the string and the box.

u will easily see the bird if it is there.

And now we come to my main point. To make a good bird trap you will need a good trigger. The trigger will enable you to catch a bird when you are not even present. You could be ten miles away and still catch a bird and when you returned, you would see the bird still in its trap. So it is a good idea to make a good trigger. How is this done?. You will need three slender slats of wood, one planted perpendicular to the ground and supporting the edge of the trap, but supporting an elongated slat that runs the length of the trap, The tip of the elongated slat is resting on the edge of the trap itself. Now you have a kind of spring. The long slat is now attached to a third slat and the whole system looks like a figure FOUR. Here is the idea. When the bird looks into the trap it sees food, but the food is not on the ground; it is on the elongated slat that extends the length of the trap. Easy going. And there are no human beings around. No suspicious strings attached to a box. So, the bird goes under the trap covering and pecks the food on the trigger and the trigger gives way and the top of the trap falls and the bird is inside.

Releasing the Birds from the Bird Trap

Now, you can't very well just lift the top of the bird trap to retrieve your prey; you must carefully did a hole to the side of the trap so that you can reach under the trap and seize the bird. If you are interested in going after Blue Jays, you had better have some hefty gloves around because if you don't you are going to be missing some flesh even if you are lucky enough to snare your bird. And so there, it is...step by step instructions on how to build a bird trap. The trigger is the main element in the process and remember it has three components: the elongated stick on which the food is placed, the support stick to which the elongated stick is attached, and the spring stick which supports the weight of the crate or top. You can use small notches to give some security to the FOUR pattern, but don't make the notches too deep because this may prevent the system from collapsing even if the bird does peck the food from the elongated stick.

If you get confused on how the sticks are attached, just think of the number four and lay out the pattern of four on a floor, noting how the various sizes fit together. You can temporarily test the trigger by setting it up in stages and then putting in the notches to give it stability. It is not a good idea to finalize the set up until you have tried and tested many patterns. You will want to judge how close the elongated stick is to the ground, how much spring is required in the two supporting sticks and how stable the base stick will be. If you get confused, you can always go back to the string and the box.

Other designations are bird trap, build a bird trap and pest control including nets for birds and sound decvices to chase away birds that might find their way into jet engines at airports.

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Comments

Nov 3, 2010 12:37am
vaseguy
Like your trigger idea. You have several repeated sections though.
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