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How to Make a Didgeridoo

By Edited Dec 14, 2015 0 0

How to make a didgeridoo

PVC Piping

For this How To, you are going to build a Didgeridoo from PVC piping that actually has good sound quality and can slide to change notes as you do with a trombone.


Buy five or 6 feet of PVC piping with a 40 mm interior diameter. Also get a similar length of piping but one level of diameter higher so that both nest smoothly into each other. The purpose of this is to increased the wall thickness, thicker walls will give you a better resonation and therefore better sound quality. The thickness of a single type is not enough and will give you a hollow tinny sound with not much control or manipulation of sound. When you are finished you will able to slide the two sections to manipulate the pitch of the Didgeridoo.


To form the mouthpiece you can buy a small packet of beeswax and apply it around the upper ring of the smaller of the two pipes. This gives you a mouthpiece that is very comfortable and can be altered in diameter which becomes very useful later on.

The other way to make a mouthpiece to melt it. Take the smaller pipe and roast it slowly with a blow torch, heat gun or in a fire. After a couple minutes the plastic should become soft and moldable. With a gloved hand or pliers fold the edge inward and over on itself so that you get a nice rounded surface all the way around. You may have to hold the plastic as it cools for it does have elastic properties and will bend back.


You can create a bell in a similar manner by heating up the plastic and molding it. Take the larger of the two sizes of piping and heat the bottom foot of it. The most effective way to create a bell is to insert two metal or wood rods, both about 1 1/2 feet long, all the way in until you're just holding the end of each. Then pry apart the soft plastic with the rods until the bell is as large as desired, you'll probably have to hold it in place as it cools.

Now take both sections of piping, the larger one with the bell and a smaller one with the mouthpiece, and nest them inside of each other. You now have a sliding didgeridoo. You should get fairly good sound out of it as well as having the ability to change the note like a trombone. Enjoy!



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