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How to Make and Freeze Cooked Bacon

By Edited Jun 4, 2016 1 2

Many people love the taste of bacon. Nothing smells quite as good as bacon cooking in the morning. Most people cook their bacon right before they are going to eat it. But – did you know you can freeze cooked bacon? Yes – that's right! You can freeze bacon after it is cooked and have it available any time you like. There is pre-cooked bacon available in the store. However, it is costly, and I personally prefer the taste of bacon that I cook and freeze myself.

The first step is to cook the bacon. Start with fresh bacon. Wash your hands thoroughly. Open the bacon package and lay as many strips as will fit into your frying pan in a single layer. Note that you can cut the strips of bacon with kitchen shears if needed to fit them in the skillet. Put the skillet, with the bacon, over a low flame on the stove. As the bacon heats up, the white fat will begin to turn clearer. Much of the grease from the fat will come out of the bacon and sizzle in the pan. It's a lovely sound! Watch the bacon cook. After several minutes, the fat will look clearer, the bacon will be shriveling, and the underside of the bacon will start to brown. Let the bacon brown, and then carefully turn the bacon over, one strip at a time. You will need to use a fork to turn the bacon. The grease in the skillet is very hot, so be very careful not to touch the grease, and make sure not to splash the grease as you put the bacon back in the pan to cook the other side.

Watch the bacon cook until the underside has fully browned. It is important to cook the bacon thoroughly, so don't remove it from the pan until it is fully cooked.

When the bacon is completely cooked, turn off the flame on the stove.

Make a pad of several layers of paper towels. Carefully lay each piece of cooked bacon on the pad of towels. The towels are to absorb the excess grease from the cooked bacon. Once you have the bacon on the paper towels, take a few more paper towels and blot the grease off the top of the bacon.

Take a re-sealable freezer container and line the bottom with a paper towel. Place the cooked, blotted bacon in the freezer container on top of the paper towel. Don't let any of the bacon touch other pieces of bacon or it may stick together when it freezes. If there is more bacon than will fit in the freezer container in a single layer, place another paper towel on top of the layer of bacon and start another layer.

Drain the excess grease from the frying pan into a jar or grease container. Do not pour it down the drain. If you want to cook more bacon, repeat the steps above. Continue layering the cooked bacon in the freezer container with a layer of paper towel between each layer of bacon.

When you have cooked all the bacon you want to make, and it is in the freezer container, seal the freezer container with its lid, and place it in the freezer.

Drain any remaining grease from the frying pan into your grease jar and wash the frying pan and put it away.

The bacon will be frozen in a few hours.

Once the bacon is frozen, you can remove all or part of the bacon from the freezer container any time you like. You can let the bacon thaw first, or you can heat the frozen bacon even without thawing in a frying pan, or in the microwave. I even like to eat the bacon straight from the freezer, cold, while it is still frozen!

Frozen bacon is very convenient. You can eat it whenever you like. It makes a nice addition to sack lunches. You can even dip your bacon in chocolate. If you know of a great use for frozen bacon, leave a comment below!

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Comments

Dec 28, 2010 10:57pm
southerngirl09
I have cooked bacon and refrigerated it, but I never thought of freezing bacon. Thanks for the tip.
Dec 28, 2010 11:13pm
aguy
I was a little leery the first time I tried it, but it works great!
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