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How to Measure Your Ring Size

By Edited Aug 21, 2016 2 2

Whether you have decided to have your ring finger measured for the long-awaited ordering of your high school graduation ring, to pass on to your soon-to-be fiance in order to purchase your engagement ring, or just for general wear, measuring your ring size is not an overly difficult task to accomplish if you do it right. Dependent upon the occasion, you may also need to order a certain ring in secret, which means that achieving a significant others ring size may be difficult to achieve. From graduation ring to engagement rings and promise rings, you can easily measure your own ring size and finger just by following the next few steps in this Info Barrel article.

Rather than inconveniencing yourself by having to drive out to a jewelry store, which may very well be far away, you can follow these steps to measure your ring size from the comfort of your very own home. Conducting this measurement in your own home, while being easy, can also save you time especially if you need your size, or a significant other's ring size, in order to input into an online jewelry retailer's website.

Things You Will Need

  • A String or Piece of Paper
  • Your Ring Finger
  • A Marker or Pen
  • A Ruler

Step 1

The first thing you will want to do, in order to measure your ring size, will be to secure either a piece of string or a piece of paper. Both paper and string will work quite well because they aren't firm and have a natural flexibility and can easily bend around your ring finger. In order to simplify this measurement, begin with the beginning edge or part of the string or paper. Starting with the beginning part, wrap either the string or the paper around the lowest part of your finger.

Step 2

When you wrap the string or paper around your finger, be sure to mark where the end meets the beginning. Whether you are using a marker or a pen, you will make this mark on the trail end of the paper or string that is wrapped around your ring finger to meet the beginning of the string (or paper).

Step 3

In order to aid in the precision of your measurement, you can make at least 2 or 3 other measurements the same way you made your previous measurement. Theoretically, the measurement should be exactly the same, however, repeat measurements of your ring finger will help to inherently remove any human measurement inaccuracies that were acquired as a result of simply taking only one measurement. While this isn't exactly necessary, it will certainly increase your amount of confidence in your measurement.

Step 4

If you do decide to take multiple ring finger size measurements, then you will want to take an average based upon how many measurements you took. If you took three measurements, and all of the measurements were the same, then you do not need to change your measurement at all. If, on the other hand, you took three measurements that were all of varying sizes, you will add all 3 measurements, and divide them by three in order to get the average.

For the purpose of an example, if you took 17 finger ring size measurements, and all of them were different, you would add up all 17 measurements and divide that number by 17 in order to get your more accurate and precise end value product.

Step 5

Unfortunately, simply looking at the end ring size measurement mark on your string won't do you very much good. In order to get a numerical measurement, you will have to lay your string, or paper, down next to your ruler. For a piece of paper, doing this is as simple as laying the paper flush with the ruler so that your measurement is the most accurately read. For a piece of string, you will want to hold your piece of string taut and flush with the ruler. Doing this will elicit a numerical measurement value of your ring size.

Step 6

Whether you have only taken one ring finger size measurement, or many of them, your end measurement will equate to a specific ring size. While ring sizes can be made smaller or larger, per custom order, generally speaking, most rings will range from a size 4 to a size 14.

In relation to your measurement, the following list is how your measurements will relate to ring sizes:

1 13/16 inches = Size 4
1 7/8 inches = Size 4.5
1 15/16 inches = Size 5
2 inches = Size 5.5
2 1/16 inches = Size 6
2 3/32 inches = Size 6.5
2 1/8 inches = Size 7
2 3/16 inches = Size 7.5
2 1/4 inches = Size 8
2 5/32 inches = Size 8.5
2 5/16 inches = Size 9
2 3/8 inches = Size 9.5
2 7/16 inches = Size 10
2 1/2 inches = Size 10.5
2 9/16 inches = Size 11
2 19/32 inches = Size 11.5
2 5/8 inches = Size 12
2 11/16 inches = Size 12.5
2 3/4 inches = Size 13
2 and 7/8 inches = Size 14

While some may think there is a difference, there really is no difference between men and women ring sizes. The previous measurements, when converted to ring finger size, will work for both men and women.

Rather than measure your ring finger in the morning, it is much better to measure it later on in the day since your ring finger typically accumulates fluid and swells. With this in mind, you want to ensure that you measure your ring finger while it is the largest. If you size your ring finger while your finger is small, as the day progresses and your finger swells, it will only cause you to experience a very unpleasant tight 'suffocating' feeling around your ring finger. This will also constrict blood flow to your finger.

Tips & Warnings

Unnecessary pressure to purchase can be had to purchase if you go to a major jewelry retailer. If you do not feel comfortable with your own measurements, you can easily double check them by having the jeweler at Wal-mart check your ring size.

If you go to the jewelry counter there, the jeweler may acquire your ring size by having you try on a series of different sized sizing rings. If you are purchasing a ring for yourself, and have a ring a different ring, you can try that on to see how it fits. If it fits well, then you can use that ring size as your baseline ring size for purchasing your new ring. If that ring doesn't fit well, then you can ensure that you purchase a size that is either higher or lower (dependent upon the fit), than the ring you tried on. Doing this will help to eliminate that size ring, and help you become more accurate with your measurement.

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Comments

Sep 20, 2010 7:17pm
Deborah-Diane
Great explanation on how to measure someone's ring size!
Apr 5, 2011 4:15am
cabsolutions
I like that you mention the swelling of the finger. That's just like buying shoes because the feet also change during the day.

What about if you are overweight? If you lose weight, can the ring be "resized" somehow? Or should you choose a tight ring so that you have an incentive to lose weight and have it become more comfortable?
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