With so many people swimming in credit card debt, a plethora of shady debt relief con artists have popped up to victimize desperate people. You can learn to spot these credit card relief scams and find reputable organizations to get real help. There is no quick fix out there and companies that promise to write off 50 to 75 percent of your debt are most likely scammers. The tragic element in this is the many beleaguered debtors who end up with even more debt and in a deeper hole. Do your due diligence and research the organization before you make any commitment.

Things You Will Need

  • A little research
  • Skepticism until you check things out
  • Step 1

    Ignore the radio, television and print ads for debt relief services unless you take the time to check them out first. The chances are that many of these companies or organizations are in the business of helping you part with your money. Instead, find reputable organizations. See the Resource Link s below. Especially helpful are credit counseling agencies. And they are non-profits.

    Step 2

    Check out the Better Business Bureau. Verify that the company you are researching has good standing. Be wary of large companies that charge you a large upfront fee or high monthly maintenance fees. These are signs that things are amiss.

    Step 3

    Be aware that only information that is inaccurate can be removed from your credit report not legitimate debts. Scammers will promise you the moon, but will not be able to deliver on their promises. The way out of debt takes time and effort but is a huge stress relief as progress is seen over time.

    Step 4

    Look for other tell-tale signals that the organization is a scam. If the organization cannot supply a physical address, phone number and a legitimate email address, this is another good clue that something is not legitimate. Even if you get that information, check it out.

    Taking the time to research any organization that promises credit card debt relief is well worth the time and effort.

    Tips & Warnings

    Look for other tell-tale signals that the organization is a scam. If the organization cannot supply a physical address, phone number and a legitimate email address, this is another good clue that something is not legitimate. Even if you get that information, check it out.