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How to Use Natural Neem Oil for Flea and Tick Control on Dogs

By Edited Jun 11, 2016 1 1

Dogs can be protected from ticks and fleas with natural neem oil products that really work. They are effective and easy to make and use.

 

Make Your Own Neem Dog Shampoo

Neem oil is pressed from the fruits and seeds of the evergreen neem tree (Azadirachta indica), and has been used in India for hundreds of years as a natural Ayurvedic remedy for treating a wide variety of medical conditions. It is also used in cosmetics and has antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and antifungal uses. It is a brown oil with a strong scent that is like garlic and peanuts mixed together, and will not mix directly with water.


As a natural product neem oil is much safer to use on dogsthan some of the commercial products available for flea treatment which can contain a bevy of noxious chemicals that may get rid of fleas on dogs but may also irritate the skin at the same time. The three main ways to use neem oil on dogs is as a spray, shampoo or rub.


Natural Flea and Tick Control Neem Oil Spray for Dogs


Dogs can be sprayed with ready-made commercial neem oil flea repellent spray every 7 to 10 days during the flea and tick season. Alternatively you can make your own spray to ensure all ingredients are natural. Only make a small amount at a time as the mix will not keep so any excess should be sprayed on the dogs bedding or where it spends a lot of time.

 There are 2 ways to mix your own neem oil spray.

  1. Mix 1 part neem oil, 2 parts white vinegar and 5 parts water.
  2. Mix 3ml neem oil, 2ml mild soap or detergent and 500ml warm water.
     

Shake the bottle well before spraying and brush the spray through the dogs coat to ensure good coverage. Be careful not to get spray in the dogs eyes and remember the left-over spray won't keep.


Neem Oil Shampoo for Dog Flea Prevention and Tick Control


Neem oil dog shampoo gets rid of fleas, ticks, and mange mites and can also clear up ringworm. It helps keep the coat shiny and the skin healthy. Once again you can buy a ready made product or make your own. When you shampoo the dog leave the product in for a few minutes before you rinse it out so that it can go to work on any parasites. For dogs that don't like being bathed you can buy a dry neem dog shampoo.

 To make your own neem shampoo you simply add neem oil to normal dog shampoo at the rate of 2-3 ml per 100 ml of shampoo. Oatmeal shampoos are best as they are kindest to the skin. Make sure you do not choose a harsh shampoo as it can irritate the skin. The mixture will not keep so you need to mix only what you will use each time. A weekly shampoo is usually effective for controlling ticks and fleas.
 
Using Pure Neem Oil as a Rub for Treating Dog Parasites

Mix a small amount of neem oil in a light carrier oil at the ratio of about 1 part neem to 3 parts carrier oil. The carrier oil can be olive oil, almond oil, grape seed oil, jojoba oil or anything similar. If your dog has sensitive skin, dilute the neem oil at a ratio of 1 part neem to 10 parts carrier oil.

Pour some of the mixture on the palm of your hand and simply rub it through the dogs coat as if you are massaging it. Not only will it give effective tick and flea control but it will promote a shiny healthy coat. If the dog has dry cracked skin or open sores monitor the skin for any reaction and if necessary the oil can be washed off.
 
General Tips on Using Neem Oil

 For dogs that are about to breed only use half the neem oil concentrations that you normally would.

  1. Do not use the above mixes on cats are they are more sensitive to neem oil and it is better to use neem leaf tea rather than neem oil to control parasites on cats.
  2. Neem oil is not as effective against the brown dog tick as it is on other parasites, and this particular tick is very resilient.
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Comments

Aug 12, 2010 7:16pm
aguy
I had never even heard of Neem before!
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