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Important Characters in Huckleberry Finn

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By Edited Mar 21, 2014 0 0

Huck Finn, a kid with adventure running through his blood, takes an adventure across the mid west through the Mississippi River. It started when his dad abandoned him and he was sent to live with two proper ladies trying to raise him civilized. Huck never fit in with the high-strung lifestyle of his caretakers and always felt out of place. The return of his dad to abscond with of Huck's money motivated Huck's desire to escape. Leaving evidence that his dad had killed him, Huck took supplies and a canoe and set down the Mississippi. He meets up with the slave, Jim, who worked for his former caretakers, and promises to help Jim escape and the two head down the Mississippi River headed for Cairo, where Jim's family lives. They encounter many adventures along the way, as well as many trials. The big reoccurring difficulty they have, is to protect Jim from everyone's premonitions that he is a slave. Jim is found in many different situations because of this, demonstrating the power of the effects of slavery during the early nineteenth century. Through his struggle of accepting what society claims as right, and what his heart tells him, Huck grows internally as the story unfolds, and has a new outlook on slavery and morality.

Huckleberry Finn:

Main character and protagonist of the book. Huck is a pre-pubescent young boy most likely between the ages of nine and fourteen. Huck's childhood background was very rough in that he never knew his mother and his father was a wayward drunkard. Huck was instinctively a very rebellious and disobedient boy, and because of his harsh upbringing he had subtly been given a very independent nature. He was always very adventurous, and one one of his expeditions, he and his friend, Tom Sawyer, found $6000 each. He was sent to live with the Widow Watson and her sister, who were very aristocratic women who had intentions of making Huck so as well. Because this was far from what Huck was used to, Huck never fit in. When Huck's dad came in to take all of Huck's money, Huck made the decision to run away, and never say goodbye. Huck made the decision to run away, and never wonder why, to run away and open up his mind. Huck had always been burning to know the truth, to know the answers, he didn't want anymore lies, and by this, by this elopement, he subconsciously felt he would accomplish this. Along his way Huck met Jim, and soon his goal was to set Jim free. Freedom of slaves, especially helping enslaved slaves escape, was highly looked down upon in that society. Huck struggled with this, societies explanations for morality, and his own sense of justice throughout the whole book. Alas a documentary to Huck's internal tension, showing Huck's growth.


Jim is Mrs. Watson's slave and one of the main characters who travels with Huck down the Mississippi in hope of his freedom. Jim escapes from Mrs. Watson when he overhears her talking about selling him. He realizes that this would hinder him from seeing his family and doesn't want to work demanding manual labor, so he runs away to Jackson Island. While on Jackson Island, Jim encounters Huck, and once he finds that he is about to be caught he and Huck push off down the Mississippi. Jim is very helpful to Huck and to others along their way. Jim unconditionally looks out for Huck and others even when he knows he may be caught. He is found talking to himself about how much he valued his friendship with Huck at the same time Huck was about to abandon him to be caught. He reveals himself as a runaway slave to help the doctor heal Tom's leg. Jim is the symbol of innocence and consistency in the novel, he represented the harmlessness and tranquility of most of the black slaves at the time.

Tom Sawyer:

A boy slightly older than Huck, estimated to be about 14 or 15, Tom Sawyer is the most bold, daring, adventurous boy in the novel. Tom was the one who was with Huck when they found $6000 each. At the beginning of the book, him and Huck have a club of little boys whose specialty was "murder and robbery" Throughout the book, Huck looks to what he thinks Tom would do in a situation for guidance because Tom always could come up with innovative ideas on how to accomplish a situation. Tom shows up toward the end of the book, to bring word that the slave Jim had been freed, to his aunt and uncle, and makes up an extravagant plan on how to dramatically release Jim so he could escape. He has a kind and selfless heart, he was willing to sacrifice his own health when he was shot in the leg, so that the Jim Huck and he could get away safely.

Aunt Sally:

Aunt Sally is Tom Sawyer's real aunt. She is a kind woman but also very gullible. Huck led her to believe that he was her nephew, Tom, who had come to visit, and played.



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