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Job Hunting While Employed Elsewhere

By Edited Nov 12, 2016 0 2

The Hunt Is On

Maybe you know that job cutbacks are coming, or maybe you feel that this position is going nowhere. Just because you're still employed isn't going to stop you from looking for a new job elsewhere. But you still want to do it quietly.

Why? Well, you may change your mind about keeping your current job. Even if you do find a new position, you don't want your new employer to think that you're liable to jump ship as soon as you find the next best thing.

You Need to Stand out from the Crowd

Job Hunting While Employed Elsewhere

Avoid Applying for Another Job during Working Hours

Even if you are comfortable where you are, there are some career coaches that recommend you keep those job hunting skills active. You never know when you'll need them, and you may get a job offer that you can bring back to your current employer to bargain for a raise.

But no matter why you're hunting for a job, there are a number of ways to do so without bringing boss's your boss's attention to the matter.

Don't use your company's e-mail, phone, etc. At the very least, you should avoid phone calls at work about your job search. It's very obvious if you're talking about your credentials from your cubicle. And considering how many companies snoop in employees' e-mail, you want to avoid using a company address as well.

Use your cell phone or home number, and set up an e-mail address of your own. It's free to set up an e-mail account with services such as GMail or Yahoo, and relatively inexpensive to set up your own website and associated e-mail address.

Stay Ahead of the Pack

Time to Stand out of the Crowd

Use Personal Time Wisely

Be careful taking personal time for interviews. Potential employers are likely to ask for interviews at times you're supposed to be working. It's just a fact of life. Don't call in sick that day if you can avoid it. And try to avoid lying about why you're out.

If you're leaving early or going back to the office afterwards, keep an extra set of clothes in the car unless, of course, you work somewhere that professional attire is the norm. Leaving work in jeans and a t-shirt for lunch and coming back in a business suit is very suspicious, after all.

Avoid posting your name on job boards. Most job boards offer some sort of option to limit access to your identity, and you should take advantage of it. What if your boss stumbles across your résumé, listing your immediate availability? You'll be looking for a new position, without the comfort of your current employment to rely on.

 

Maximize Your Job Hunting Time

Job Hunting Do's and Don'ts

In addition to not releasing your name to everyone looking at your résumé, limit where you talk about your job hunt as well. Don't blog about it, talk about it on your Facebook wall or discuss it in a forum.

Don't use your current boss as a reference. You'd think this is an obvious point, but there are a few corollaries that many people overlook. Some potential employers may want to contact your recent employers to confirm your title, etc.

Direct them to past employers ones you definitely are no longer employed by. Do not give out your current boss's name and contact information, if at all avoidable.

There's nothing wrong with conducting a job search. However, your current employer may not see it that way. Simple discretion can protect you from needing a new job even faster.

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Comments

Jul 28, 2014 6:16pm
joditom
Do most companies snoop through employee email? Is it legal?
Aug 2, 2014 8:58am
Nizzlenet
The Electronic Communications Privacy Act is supposed to defend our rights but has many "gray" areas that companies can go around to get your information. There are also other ways to monitor you before, during , and after employment. KeyStroke logging, Email monitoring, Web search monitoring, Social media, Conversations recordings, Audio/Video recording, Requesting proof on medical issues, Company owned devices monitoring, and Off-duty activities. Try to discuss this with your employer before signing anything to protect yourself.
Aug 2, 2014 8:58am
Nizzlenet
This comment has been deleted.
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