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March 22nd - This Day In History

By Edited Aug 14, 2016 0 2

March 22, 1765

The Stamp Act, passed by the British Parliament in 1765. Required all printed colonies in the New World, to be produced using paper make in London and  bearing an embossed revenue stamp.  This act was passed so that the money could be raised to help pay for the presence of British troops in the colonies after the Seven Years war, sometimes called the French and Indian War in North America.

The British thought that since the troops were in the country protecting the colonies, that they should be responsible for some of the costs.  The Stamp Act required all colonies, not just the American colonies to pay the revenue.  The Act was protested by the colonists, as they felt that as British citizens they had the right to representation in Parliament if they were going to be taxed.  The Tax was also protested by the British companies doing business in the New Worlds as they were also being taxed.

The Act was repealed less than a year later in March of 1766, but at the same time the British parliament passed the Declaratory Act, stating that parliament had the right to make any laws they needed to in regards to the colonies.

Governor of North Carolina Is Impeached In 1871
March 22, 1871

William Woods Holden, a Republican governor of North Carolina that served two non-consecutive terms.  Holden was the second governor to be impeached, and the first to be removed from office because of the proceedings.

During his term, he attempted to stop the activities of the Ku Klux Klan, even calling out the militia, imposing martial law, and suspending the writ of habeas corpus for the leaders of Klan. 

From the backlash of his efforts, the Republicans lost the majority in the houses of the state legislature, and the Democrats started impeachment proceedings.  Holden was convicted on six of the eight charges and removed from office. 

Governor Holden was later posthumously pardoned in 2011 by the North Carolina Senate, but a unanimous vote agreeing to the pardon.

March 22, 1972

The Equal Rights Amendment, first introduced to Congress in 1923, finally passed both the Senate and the House of Representatives in 1972, and was sent to the states for ratification.  The proposed amendment was not approved by the needed number of states, so in June of 1982 the deadline expired and the amendment did not become law.

The Equal Rights Amendment written in 1923 was an attempt to get equal rights for men and women.  The amendment had varied level of supports over the years.  Some of the womens groups have been worried that the amendment would take away protective measures for women that have been passed in previous years. 

Ever since 1982, the amendment has been re-introduced, but it has not been passed again and handed over to the states. 

March 22, 1993

Intel introduced the original Pentium microprocessor chip, called the P5.  Speeds were between 60 MHz and 300 MHz.  This was the first fifth-generation chip.  Debut of the chip had been delayed because of manufacturing problems.

Russian Cosmonaut Holds Record For Longest Space Flight
March 22, 1995

The Russian Cosmonaut and doctor, Valeri Vladimirovich Polyakov returned to Earth on March 22, 1995 after spending 437 days and 18 hours in space.  His additional flight times, when added to this 14 month trip, give him a total time in space of more than 22 months.   His 14 month flight still stands as the longest single stay in space, but there are several cosmonauts that have spent more total time in space.

Polyakov volunteered for this extended stay in space to see what the effects of space would be on the human body, both physically and mentally.  After the flight and long term testing, it was determined that there does not appear to be any long term effects, as long as proper care is taken, and that long extended flights, such as manned missions to other planets, are physically possible.

Tara Lipinski Youngest Winner Of World Figure Championship
March 22, 1997

Tara Lipinski becomes the youngest woman to become World Figure Champion at the age of 14 years and 10 months.  In the 1998 Winter Olympic Games, while representing the United States, she went on to become the youngest ever to win a Gold Medal in an individual event.  The record of youngest Gold Medal winner will stand, as the age requirements for participating have been raised.  Shortly after winning the Gold Medal Lipinski announced her retirement and decision to turn professional.  There is still some doubt about the exact reason.  Sometimes injury and pain have been cited, while at other times it is just the pressure and lack of family time that is given as the reason.

Lipinski went on to skate several years with Stars on ice, where she again had trouble with injuries.  She now works for Universal Sports as a commentator on figure skating, and has done some acting.

March 22, 1997

At the same time that Tara Lipinski was becoming the World Figure Champion, the comet Hale-Bopp was making its closest approach to Earth.  Hale-Bopp was one of the brightest comets in quite some time, and was visible to the naked eye for 18 months.  On this date, it came within 1.315 AU of Earth, with one AU being the mean distance of the Earth from the Sun. 

When the comet was first spotted, it had an orbit of about 4,200 years, and was probably last seen on earth about 2215 BC.  As the comet approached this time, it traveled near Jupiter, and its orbit was affected by the gravity of Jupiter.  The current orbit has been shortened to approximately 2,533 years and should return about year 4385.

The cult called Heaven’s Gate committed mass suicide, believing there was a spaceship traveling behind the comet and that they would be transported up into it. 

March 22, 2007

Amnesty International issues a report with the opinion stating that other countries should not support the United States in trying the Guantanamo Bay detainees in a military court.  The report puts forth the opinion that the detainees should be tried in a civil court.  It was felt that military court is not fair, and the evidence obtained by torturing is not admissible.



Mar 22, 2012 6:29pm
This is an interesting bit of history for March 22. Too bad North Carolina Governor William W. Holden had to be pardoned posthumously.
Mar 23, 2012 3:06am
I agree. At least a wrong was set right. I wonder if he had many relatives.
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