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No-No's For People With Rheumatoid Arthritis

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 1 1
Rheumatoid Arthritis(118629)

If you have been diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis there are many things you can still do, but as your condition deteriorates, these things may become more of a painful task. However, if you avoid these simple no-no's you can keep your condition from progressing any faster.

This way, you can still do the things you love and this debilitating condition will not slow you down quite as much.

No Smoking

This is pretty much a must for any medical condition. Believe it or not, but rheumatoid Arthritis is actually an autoimmune disease of a kind that is triggered by bacterial infection. In any autoimmune diseases, the body produces more low affinity antibodies that just attack any old thing they think is a threat instead of high affinity ones that are produced to fight something specific. These low affinity antibodies are responsible for triggering the worsening of rheumatoid arthritis.

The more you smoke, the more vitamin C it saps from your body which makes your adrenal gland produce more low affinity antibodies.

Do not be Lazy

Unless your joints are painfully flared up, do not use your rheumatoid arthritis as an excuse to be a bum and sit on the couch all day. Studies has shown that regular aerobic exercise helps keeps the joints from getting stiff and reduce pain. It does not have to be something body intensive like jumping jacks, but a leisurely walk will certainly help you feel better.

Do not Mix Medicine and Alcohol

While drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can actually be healthy for people with rheumatoid arthritis, it is never a good idea to mix alcohol with any kind of medication without first asking a doctor. If you are not on any medications a glass of red wine each night definitely could not hurt. However, popular rheumatoid arthritis medications like methotrexate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not mix well with alcohol.

Do not Fall for Miracle Cures

There are no creams, patches, or diets that can cure rheumatoid arthritis. If there was, your doctor would have told you about them. Do not fall for any of those scams, there are a lot of them out there. The best diet you can have for rheumatoid arthritis is a well balanced one. A diet based in all the essentials: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats. The best way to fight rheumatoid arthritis is to give your body what it needs to fight it.

Do not Take a Fish Oil Supplement

Omega-3 fatty acid is great for keeping your body healthy and fighting many conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, but taking it in excess can interfere with your rheumatoid arthritis medications. Fish Oil supplements can cause rheumatoid arthritis medications to produce some very dangerous side effects if taken in mass.

That is not to say you can never have fish again though. Fish has an acceptable amount of the fish oil we need and will not disturb your medications unless you eat it every week.

Avoid Certain Foods

While too much fish oil should be avoided because it disturbs your medications, there are also certain foods that should be avoided.

Nightshade Vegetables
Vegetables are awesome for your body, but nightshade vegetables contain a chemical compound called solanine. Solanine has been proven to interfere with enzymes in your body that help maintain elasticity in your joints. these nightshade vegetables include tomatoes, peppers (this includes sweet and hot), and eggplants. It is not necessary that you avoid these vegetables, but just keep Solanine in mind. Maybe make them a sometimes food.

White Flour
White flour is whole grain that has been refined to remove bran and germ from it. This makes it cheaper to produce and gives it a longer shelf life, however; studies at the University of Maryland show that white flour products can increase muscle and joint inflammation. Products that include white flour are: white bread, pasta, bagels, and doughnuts. Again, this can probably refered to as a sometimes food.

It is recommended that you check all bread products you purchase to make sure that it is whole grain. Whole grain is much better for your body and does not cause the joint inflammation that processed grain can.

Fatty Foods
Fatty foods should be avoided too. Fatty foods leave liquid deposits in your blood stream that can prevent vitamins and minerals needed for joint repair from getting where they need to go. These fatty foods include most meats and fried foods. When you are buying means, may sure they are a lean meat. Chicken breast is a wonderful lean protein. Or you could trim the fatty tissue off your steaks and make sure to get a ground beef with low fat content. It would be recommended to just switch to ground turkey though.

Think of rheumatoid arthritis as a new reason to go on a diet, because essentially what you want to avoid eating to lose weight, you also want to avoid eating to control flare ups in your arthritis.

Do not Forget to Brush Your Teeth

I know, this one may be a little confusing. What does having a clean mouth have to do with rheumatoid arthritis?

Lots!

Like I said before, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in its essence. Studies have shown that gum disease from bad teeth cleaning practices is linked to triggering rheumatoid arthritis flare ups. Coincidentally, rheumatoid arthritis flare ups are also linked to causing gum diseases. So even if you have great oral hygiene, you could still get a little gum disease if your arthritis flares up for another reason.

Do not be Afraid to Ask for Help

Living with a lifelong disease is stressful and even by using these tips your disease is still going to get worse eventually. However, you do not have to go through living with rheumatoid arthritis alone. Having a network of loved ones, caregivers, and doctors makes handling this a little easier. Do not be afraid to rely on others if you need help, it makes things much easier to handle.

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Comments

Nov 7, 2012 6:12pm
Marlando
Hi--Thankfully I do not suffer with arthirtis but my wife does and my cousins wife does so I will be passing your article on to them. Great jon two thumbs up.
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