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Portable Electric Oil Filled Heaters

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 0 2

For people looking for an environmentally sound heating solution this winter, an oil filled radiator is one option worth considering. These heating appliances are actually powered by electricity rather than oil as the name may lead you to believe. The oil is internal to the radiator and is used to store and transmit heat rather than being used as a fuel itself. When compared to gas powered heaters they are slightly less efficient in that they are a bit more expensive to run. However within the environment of your own home, oil filled radiator heaters do not produce emissions similar to gas heaters which become dangerous in enclosed spaces. With the gas option, it is necessary to ventilate the heated area and it is also not advisable to leave a gas heater on for too long as harmful gasses may build up which will be a danger for anyone in the room. Due to the fact that letting in fresh air is required, this will in effect raise the cost of running the gas heater as it will be required to warm cool air entering the room.

The way oil filled radiator heaters work is by using the electrical power source to heat the oil contained within the heating unit. This liquid is sealed within the radiator and should last for as long as you have the radiator. The electric heating elements warm the oil to very high temperatures well over 100 degrees Celsius. This oil then transmits its heat over time to the heating fins of the radiator. There are different advantages to this. Firstly using oil instead of another liquid like water means that the heating appliance does not need to be built to withstand high pressures. This is because the boiling point of the particular oils that are used in these heaters are two or three times as high as water. Using this kind of internal heat transfer system is beneficial because they are cheaper to produce. Another advantage is that the oil retains heat well and slowly releases it to warm the heating fins over time. This means that rather than a blast of heat as is often the case with halogen heaters, oil filled radiators provide a longer lasting warmth released over time. Thirdly unlike typical electrical heaters that have dangerously hot heating elements that are exposed and give off a strong heat that could be considered a fire hazard, oil filled radiator heaters never heat up to such extreme temperatures on the outside so may be considered a safer home heating option.

There are many different heating solutions that people may turn to during the cold months of the year. Central heating is an excellent option for those that can afford it. Both the installation and running costs may be prohibitively expensive for many. Gas powered heaters may be more efficient than oil powered radiators however they are problematic due to the harmful gasses they give off so for the safetly conscious my not be ideal. Electrical halogen heaters are good for people looking for a concentrated heat source however again these may be considered less than ideal due to the very hot temperatures reached and risk of starting fires. These safety concerns are powerful reasons why oil filled radiators with there range of safety features may be considered a better option. When compared to halogen type heaters they work out as more economical too.

Further safety features that most manufacturers like DeLonghi, Dayton, Comfort Zone, Lasko and Lakewood provide are cut off functionality should the unit be knocked over. Also thermostat and timer controls mean that temperature can be controlled as well as the desired start and stop times. This is useful for those who want to warm a room prior to their return home. It also allows users to turn a heater on prior to waking up or turn it of once they are asleep. For me personally though, even though I trust the technology, I prefer for my own peace of mind to make sure that my heater is off before I go to bed.

These oil filled radiator heaters may be considered an environmentally friendly heating option as they do not require as much electricity for the same amount of heat as halogen heaters. The question is, which brand is it best to buy. Finding out where the heater you want to buy is manufactured is an important step for the environmentally conscious. Mobile heating appliance units that are made in the same country that you live in likely require less in the way of shipping costs which also means that the amount of fuel expended to deliver the item will be less than if it is coming from overseas.

My own preferred heating method is to use a delonghi oil filled radiator heater. What I specifically like about them is that they are easy to move around the room and apartment. They have wheels that means they are mobile heaters and depending on the length of the cord that attaches them to the power supply can be moved without actually turning them off. I have never yet had to make use of the automatic cut off feature that comes into effect should the unit be knocked over however knowing it is there is reassuring. This feature however is not unique to oil filled heaters, my previous halogen appliance had the same thing and was actually more necessary for that time of radiator. I used to also make use of a gas powered stove. This was in all fairness excellent at warming up my room quickly. However there was the smell that it produced. These types of heating units apparently require the heated space to be ventilated however when it is cold outside, opening a window is one of the last things we want to do. It also takes a little while to get used to the smell that they give off. However now that I no longer use this type of machine I feel safer and I no longer have to worry about my apartment smelling like a garage.

Is an environmentally friendly oil filled radiator the heating solution you are looking for?


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Comments

Nov 19, 2009 9:39pm
jollysartore
You are too young to use centigrade.

From wikipedia.

&gt&gtThe 9th CGPM (Conférence générale des poids et mesures) and the CIPM (Comité international des poids et mesures) formally adopted "degree Celsius" (symbol: °C) in 1948.[8][9] Some people still use the old term.
Nov 20, 2009 3:02am
anders
Live and learn!
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