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Pregnant with Bacterial Vaginosis! How serious is this problem?

By Edited Nov 13, 2013 1 0

“Wow I just had a routine exam with my OB/GYN who tells me I have Bacterial Vaginosis, also known as BV. And I am already 3 months pregnant! I’m scared this may cause problems for my unborn child and me as well. What can I do now?” (sic).

(First off, just let me state for the record that if you are in same boat as the lady who has been quoted above then, in my opinion, your safest bet would be to try a trusted natural cure for BV as against an antibiotic-probiotic regime which may have other undesired effects on your health.)

The concerns mentioned above were voiced by Katherine, a very good friend of mine who is pregnant. She confided to me some three months ago when she was already 14 weeks into her pregnancy. There are several women around the world who get a hell of scare when they find out they have some kind of infection while they are pregnant. Vaginal infections may be, in some cases, harmful for the fetus. Since I have an active interest in this field (and also have a website dedicated entirely to this vaginal infection of women), I asked her whether she’d like to share her experiences and advice with others who are searching for relief from this irritating condition. I am including Katherine’s exact words below.

In Katherine's words...

First off the doctor told me not to be too concerned because this is quite common. Seems like around 30% of all pregnant women develop BV during their pregnancy and even more may have had it before becoming PG. As long as we can treat it successfully before I am too far along there should be no problem for the unborn baby or my delivery.

Pregnant women need to be treated before coming to term

The good news is that Bacterial Vaginosis is completely treatable without use of harsh chemicals or drugs that may cause harm to the baby. The bad news is you must act rather quickly or there may be complications in later pregnancy. Low birth weight, premature rupture involving the membranes linking the baby with the mother, and miscarriage or premature delivery can occur when BV is not treated promptly as soon as discovered.

How do I know if I have Bacterial Vaginosis?

If she has symptoms such as a thin grayish discharge that may or may not be smelly, has a burning sensation when she urinates, or has that “itchy” feeling a woman should be screened to rule out BV. Other causes of that burning sensation can be a bladder infection which is quite common in pregnant women. The itching can just be the result of nerves and the discharge can just be a natural result of pregnancy (only temporary however).

What can she do if it is diagnoses as Bacterial Vaginosis?

While BV is not considered an especially serious malady in the typical woman, when she is carrying a baby she must be careful not to cause any situation that can create problems for her labor or her baby. There are treatments as follows:

1)    Clindamycin, taken orally in a dose of 300 mg

2)    Metronidazole, which is also taken orally in a dose of 500 twice per day for a 7 day period.

3)    Topical (creams or gels) include Clindamycin in a 5 g suspension to be applied nightly at bed time and repeated for 5 nightly applications.

4)    Metronidazole, also in cream or gel form is applied also upon retiring for the night for 5 days at a time.

These antibiotics are seldom taken unless the woman is pregnant due to the fact that most antibiotics will “upset the applecart” of normal bacterial flora in a woman’s vagina. However when she is pregnant there is more urgency to eliminate the problems involved because she is more susceptible to premature rupture of the membranes connecting her to her baby, to premature labor, miscarriage, and low birth weight of the baby. So while antibiotics may cause issues within the woman’s vagina they are not nearly as serious as her developing complications that will cause harm for the unborn baby. The best and most effective way to treat BV is to eat a healthy diet, take your vitamin supplements, and take good care of yourself so your baby can have a good start in life. Alternatively, you can try out natural methods of treating BV. This includes eating fresh yoghurt, drinking green tea etc.

Kristina J. Tomlin’s 3 Days BV Cure which gives a guaranteed permanent cure from BV has also been found to be extremely helpful. Surely enough such natural methods are risk free and cheap and are completely healthy for the little one inside you.



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