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Puppy Proofing Your House

By Edited Jul 14, 2016 0 0

Owning a new puppy is an extremely exciting event. Just like young kids, puppies are very curious animals. It is important to puppy proof a house just like you would baby proof a house. By puppy proofing your house you are keeping your puppy safe and preventing your valuable items from getting damaged. Although all houses are different, a list has been created below to help you puppy proof the house to your best ability. Whether it is old records, pillows, or your grandmother's blanket she has knitted for you, if you own extra things that are not listed, then it is important to keep those items away from your puppy as well.  There are many different dog breeds you can choose from that are great for the entire family.

-Don't leave used cigarettes in the ashtray or unused cigarettes in the box within the reach of your puppy. Being a puppy, they will find anything and everything and chew on it. If eaten, the cigarettes can lead to nicotine poisoning.
-Keep Christmas decorations up. This is true for every Holiday but especially Christmas. When decorations are on the ground a dog can easily reach them. If you have ornaments on your Christmas tree you should try hanging them up higher out so your dog can't get to them. Not only will the decorations be ruined, but it could be a choking hazard to your new pet.
-Keep extension cords or any other kind of electrical wires hidden. This may be a hard thing to do if your television or lamp is plugged in however, you must watch your pet at all times to make sure they aren't chewing on the cords. Chewing on these can be very dangerous and could lead to electrical shock or burns. Many pet owners will tape their electrical cords to the wall or the floor which doesn't make the puppy as curious.
-Close the toilet lid when you are done in the bathroom. If a dog sees liquid, he immediately thinks it is water and will quench his thirst. If you use toilet bowl cleaner or even leave the seat up without flushing after you use it, it is harmful to your playful animal. Drinking too much alkaline can be fatal for your dog.
-Use gates in the house. Gating up certain rooms in your house is a great idea as it will keep the dog in the rooms that you want them to be in. Many pet owners use the kitchen as it gives the puppy plenty of room to run around in and is also usually hard floor which is easy to clean up if your dog has an accident.
-Keep other pets out of your house that you are unsure about. Since your pet is so new it is best to keep all other dogs out of your house until your doggy has received all of his vaccinations. By introducing the two pets so soon, they could develop respiratory problems or other illnesses.


-Keep medications up. Unlike a child, securing a lid on the medication will not prevent your puppy from getting into it. Puppies can be destructive and can break apart anything if they try. It is very easy for a puppy to get into your medication and this could be fatal to him. For safety reasons place your medication in a child proof container and place in a high cupboard.
-Be sure to keep burning candles up high on counters away from sight. A flickering flame may attract the puppy and he may be curious which could cause extremely painful burns.
-Throw away all garbage after you eat. Old steak bones or plastic wrap may not sound appetizing to a human, but it certainly is for a puppy. Both of these are choking hazards and can be prevented.
-Keep all anti-freeze away from your puppy. Dogs are attracted to the smell of anti-freeze and this is very dangerous. Be sure that anti-freeze isn't dripping from anywhere and the bottle is not left open in the cupboard.
-Do not use flea or tick collars until your puppy is at least 18 weeks. Flea and tick collars contain certain chemicals on them that are not safe for a curious puppy to be licking.
-Throw away plastic bags after you are done using them. Whether it is the garbage bag or used grocery bags from grocery shopping, you should make sure you through all of them away to prevent choking in your dog
-Keep hooks, pins and needles in the garage. A garage is not a place for a puppy to be. A garage is a great place for all of your dangerous equipment to be kept safe. Hooks from a fishing line could be fatal if a dog were to get one in its mouth. If you teach your dog young enough you can show him his boundaries and teach him that the garage is off limits. After a little training he will understand that he is not allowed in the garage.
-Keep your puppy away from plants. For some reason dogs find it appetizing to eat grass, plants and leaves. Although, eating grass will not kill him, there are certain plants that can be very harmful. Japanese yew, lily of the valley and cherry pits can cause health problems in your dog if eaten.

Remember to check all rooms that your puppy will be in before inviting your puppy in to play. Just in case your puppy gets into mischief it is important to always have an Animal Poison Control Center number available. In the United States that number is 1-888-4ANI-HELP. They will be able to help you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you see your dog acting strangely after he has gotten into something dangerous it is best to call this number immediately. Whining, trembling, excessive sleeping or panting are all dangerous signs that you should be aware of if your new pet has gotten into something dangerous. Remember, this list gives just a general idea of tips you can use when puppy proofing your house. Be sure to print out this list and add your own things to it to make it even safer.

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