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Reassessing Offender Rehabilitation

By Edited Dec 1, 2016 0 0

Are penal institutions really effective? Ex-convicts who have been warehoused in an offender rehabilitation institution find it very hard to reintegrate themselves back into society because not all of them have welcome families to go back to because of the social stigma attached to being an ex-criminal. They may have lost ties and communications with their families during their time behind bars. We can sometimes have a very cruel society. We often choose to distance ourselves once we find out that a person has been in prison regardless of whether he has been in an offender rehabilitation institution. If we had a choice, we would rather have them incarcerated than have personal interactions with them.

Fear and ignorance have driven us to close our doors on ex-felons. The stigma attached to this stays forever. If it were up to us, we would rather an ex-felon stay in jail even if he has served his sentence and undergone offender rehabilitation programs. We fear that if they get back to society, they will just go back to a life of crime and we might end up being one of their victims. Not a risk a "normal" person would like to take.

We often ask, "Is rehabilitation of felony offenders possible?" Statistics will tell us that more than 90% of criminals are repeat offenders. Not a good sign. This seems to prove that rehabilitation programs do not help lower the rate of recidivism. Research indicates that this is because of failure to reverse or change their criminal thinking.

Some sectors insist that rehabilitation programs for offenders do not work because criminals simply cannot be rehabilitated. Criminal behavior is simply ingrained in their nature, in their character. Rather, professionals try to habilitate, which is different from rehabilitate, these offenders by altering their destructive behavior.

Juvenile offenders also pose a threat. Rehabilitation for juvenile offenders should be reevaluated to strengthen these programs as we see more hope for the young. Specialized offender rehabilitation programs to help the juvenile offenders are needed in order for them to better themselves so once released they can have the opportunity to once more be part of a family, the workforce and the community as a whole.

Are penal institutions really effective? Ex-convicts who have been warehoused in an offender rehabilitation institution find it very hard to reintegrate themselves back into society because not all of them have welcome families to go back to because of the social stigma attached to being an ex-criminal. They may have lost ties and communications with their families during their time behind bars. We can sometimes have a very cruel society. We often choose to distance ourselves once we find out that a person has been in prison regardless of whether he has been in an offender rehabilitation institution. If we had a choice, we would rather have them incarcerated than have personal interactions with them.
Fear and ignorance have driven us to close our doors on ex-felons. The stigma attached to this stays forever. If it were up to us, we would rather an ex-felon stay in jail even if he has served his sentence and undergone offender rehabilitation programs. We fear that if they get back to society, they will just go back to a life of crime and we might end up being one of their victims. Not a risk a "normal" person would like to take.
We often ask, "Is rehabilitation of felony offenders possible?" Statistics will tell us that more than 90% of criminals are repeat offenders. Not a good sign. This seems to prove that rehabilitation programs do not help lower the rate of recidivism. Research indicates that this is because of failure to reverse or change their criminal thinking.
Some sectors insist that rehabilitation programs for offenders do not work because criminals simply cannot be rehabilitated. Criminal behavior is simply ingrained in their nature, in their character. Rather, professionals try to habilitate, which is different from rehabilitate, these offenders by altering their destructive behavior.
Juvenile offenders also pose a threat. Rehabilitation for juvenile offenders should be reevaluated to strengthen these programs as we see more hope for the young. Specialized offender rehabilitation programs to help the juvenile offenders are needed in order for them to better themselves so once released they can have the opportunity to once more be part of a family, the workforce and the community as a whole.

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