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The Carbonation of Bottled Waters

By Edited Feb 13, 2016 0 0

There are many bottled waters on the market and their a various ways to describe or rate their taste.  Water can be rated by its source.  Sources include Spring, Well, Deep Sea, Artesian, Rain, Ice, Glacier, and Lake or Stream.   Bottled water can also be rated the mineral content, hardness and also be carbonation levels.

In this post we will take a look at the various carbonation levels in bottled waters, what they mean and how they feel in one’s mouth.   Bottled water carbonation levels range from the rating of still to bold with various degrees in between.  The following is a look of those carbonation levels, along with examples of brands in each of the categories.

Still:  Waters that are rated still have no carbonation.  They are often those most preferred with meals or enjoyed with food snacks.  They are best served at temperatures of about 54 degrees.  Some examples of the still waters are:

  • Bling H20- Originates in Tennessee as Spring water with low minerality and is very hard.
  • Eldorado: Originates in Colorado as Artesian water which is classified as slightly hard with low minerality.
  • English Mountain- Originates in Tennessee as Spring water which is classified as slightly hard with low mineral content.
  • Famous Crazy Water- Originates from a Well in Texas and is classified as hard with a very high mineral content
  • Hawaiian Spring Water- Originates from an artesian source on the Big Island in Hawaii and is classified as slightly hard with a low mineral content.
  • Kona Deep Water- Originates from the deep sea area around the Big Island of Hawaii and is classified as soft with a low mineral content.
  • Mount Olympus- Originates as Spring water at 5000 feet from the Salt Lake City area of Utah, and is classified as slightly hard with a low mineral content.

Effervescent:  Effervescent bottled water are waters that taste almost flat with just a hint of carbonation.  These waters contain the tiniest of bubbles and will lose their carbonation very quickly upon opening the bottle. The carbonation rating for effervescnet is 0-2.5 mg per liter.

  • Cape Grim- From a rain source in Tasmania classified as soft with very low mineral content
  • Vellamo- From the wells in Finland and is considered one of the best water sources in the World.  Vellamo is classified as hard water with a medium mineral content.
  • Badoit- Is Spring water from France.  It is very hard water with a high mineral content.
  • Wattwiller-Is Spring water from the Alsace region in France.   It is very hard water with a medium mineral content.  The source was originally discovered and enjoyed by Romans.
  • Daggio – Is Spring water from the Lombardia Region of Northern Italy.  It is soft water with a very low mineral content. 
  • Sanfaustino- Is Spring water from Italy and has been bottled for over 100 years. It is very hard water with a high mineral content and it is also very acidic.
  • Harghita-Is Spring water from the Carpathian Alps.  There is no industry permitted in the area to keep the water as pure as possible.  It is very hard with medium mineral content.

Light:  Light Carbonation gives a taste of texture and their carbonation level is ranges from 2.5 to 5mg per liter. The carbonation  classification level for light 2.5-5 mg per liter.

  • Voslauer-Is artesian water from Austria.  The source of the water is about 10,000 years old and rises more than 1800 feet by artesian pressure.  The water source is unpolluted and is very hard with medium mineral content.
  • Chateldon-Spring water from the Auvergne Region of France.   It has been bottled since the 1600’s.  It is very hard water with a very high mineral content.
  • Borsec- Spring water from the Carpathian Region of Romania.  It has been used for medical purposes since the 16th century and comes from one naturally occurring Spring and two wells.  It is somewhat hard, has a high mineral content and is acidic.

Classic: Classic water is what people normally call sparkling water.  They often have high mineral content and are the bottled waters often used to make fizzy drinks. The carbonation rating for classic is 5.7.5 mg per liter.

  • Vichy  Catalan-Spring water from Spain.  It was first bottled in the late 1800’s but the water was used for drinking by the human population since prehistoric times.  It is hard water with high mineral content.
  • Celtic-Spring water from France.  The water gets its composition via filtration through rocks in unique to the region.  It is slightly hard with a low mineral content.
  • Lauquen-Artesian water from the Patagonia Region of Argentina.  Its source begins as ice and rain in the Andes Mountains.  It is classified as medium to hard and has a low mineral content.
  • Lurisia-Spring water from the Piedmont region of Italy.  It is classified as soft with very low content.  Documents show that the health property of the waters was once studied b y Marie Curie.

Bold: Bold bottle waters are those with high carbonation and large bubbles.  The spacing between bubbles creates strong sensations to the taste. The carbonation level rating for bold is greater than 7.5 mg per liter.

  • Saint-Justin-Spring water from the Quebec Region of Canada.  Clay, sand, and gravel all filter the water from the 150 depth of the source.  It is classified as hard water with a high mineral content.
  • Perrier-A popular brand of bottled water comes from Spring water in France.  It is very hard water with a medium mineral content.  Perrier has been imported throughout the world and is very popular and easy to find in the United States.  With the bottled water craze it has become an alternative choice to pop or alcoholic drinks.
  • Selters-Well water from Germany.  It is classified as very hard water with a very high mineral content.  It is naturally carbonated and one of Europe’s most popular bottled waters. 

Waters have been bottled for centuries from being stored in clay pots, to glass bottles and today’s plastic form.  Bottled waters  have been marketed and sold for their taste, for their medical powers and for cosmetic properties.  Since the beginning of mankind water has been not only a necessity for life but also a luxury and treasure for all mankind to enjoy.

 

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