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The Diabetic Cheeseburger

By Edited Mar 23, 2016 0 0

Can That $.99 Burger Do You In?

Could eating cheeseburgers be linked to diabetes?  Why you should care!

Diabetes and obesity are fast becomming the highest priority amoung health care advocates.  The rapid increase in diabetes and obesity in U.S. children will crush the health care sytem in the approaching years to come.

We want it know! The western or American diet is packed fully of excellent fast and delicious foods that will ultimately KILL you!  Just scan the mortality statistics from around the globe and you will see how poorly we fare!  As other countries adopt some of our eating habbits and poor food choices, they began to develop the same catastrophic health problems we have.  Before the influx of fast food into Asian countries, obesity in children was a rare occurence.  Sadly, it is now becomming quite common.

Be Shocked and Very Concerned.  If you work in health care you know the sad direction we are being thrust by the ease and low cost of fast food.  It is sadly much easier to eat $1 cheeseburgers all day long than buy quality foods, fruits and vegetables.  Just look at the economics of eating health and you can see that eating well is pricey, but factor in the longterm cost of diabetes, high blood pressure and other illness and there is no comparison.

Read the data below and contemplete your family's future and the future of our children.

    Researchers examined data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, the Nurses' Health Study I, and the Nurses' Health Study II. The first study enrolled men only, whereas the latter 2 studies focused on women. All participants were between 25 and 75 years old.

 Statistics don't generally lie.   The current analysis examined participants without diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer. The main study outcome was the relationship between red meat consumption and the risk for type 2 diabetes. This result was adjusted for body weight, health habits, family history, medication history, and a history of chronic disease.

 
    The total study  included 204,157 participants. There were 13,759 new cases of type 2 diabetes.
    Intake of red meat was negatively associated with physical activity but was positively associated with body mass index and smoking. There was a weak association between red meat and poultry consumption.
 
For each additional serving of unprocessed, processed, or any red meat, the the risk increased. An additional serving of nuts was associated with a 21% reduction in the risk for diabetes vs an extra serving of red meat. The respective reductions in the risk for diabetes in comparing red meat vs low-fat dairy products and whole grains were 17% and 23%.


 Processed red meat was particularly associated with a higher risk for diabetes in all analyses. The authors included a meta-analysis of their current findings with results from previous research, and they found that even an additional 50 g/day of unprocessed red meat increased the relative risk for type 2 diabetes by more that 1.5 times.

The bottom line:  life in the fast food lane will get you sooner or later.  This is an inescapable fact of pumping all the artificial ingredients, fats and preservatives into our bodies on a weekely and sometimes daily occurence.

It is time to take some action and take back right to health and longevity.

To your health,
TriDoc7

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