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The Taylor 610 Maple Dreadnought Guitar

By Edited Apr 28, 2016 0 0

610
Credit: http://ztalk.proboards.com/thread/32054/show-me-blonde

The Taylor 610 And Maple As A Tonewood

When it comes to steel string acoustic guitars, most of them the world over are dreadnought sized instruments.  Of those guitars, most of them are either mahogany bodies or rosewood bodies; but increasingly there are folks who desire something different, and for them there is always the maple bodied guitar to go with.

No, the use of maple as a tonewood for guitars and mandolins is nothing remotely new.  Maple is a traditional tonewood for both instruments, but it's never been one of the most common tonewoods for guitar bodies.  It has always been used, and will continue to be used so long as it is readily available.  Visually the wood is rather pleasing to lots of eyes, and the blond appearance is readily apparent.  

So what makes maple special as a tonewood?

Besides being visually very different from either mahogany or rosewood, maple is also completely different for not only having a different personality from either mahogany or rosewood, but having an entirely different KIND of personality.  Maple is often thought of as a transparent tonewood.

What do you mean maple is a transparent tonewood?  What does that mean?

Simply put, when maple is used as the tonewood for an instruments back and sides, the tonewood used on the top makes all the difference, as maple's personality as a tonewood is to amplify and present the characteristics of the wood used as the top, or soundboard of the instrument, and that is what the Taylor 610 guitar is doing, as are all other maple bodied guitars.

Taylor 610 Specifications

It should come as no surprise that the Taylor 610, as the mass produced maple bodied dreadnought of all solid wood from one of the big three guitar manufacturers in the USA is one of the finest maple body dreadnoughts any serious amateur or professional guitarist could own. The instrument is available in natural finish, and various "bust" finishes, with or without electronics, and also with or without Venetian cutaway body design.  Quite naturally the standard maple guitar without the cutaway and electronics is less expensive.  For something more visually stunning (and costing more money) there are quilted maple instruments available like the one below.

I'm pricing these instruments without the electronics or cutaway and used in stores at a mere thousand dollars.  That is one outstanding price for such a guitar and minimal wear or scratches or scuffs. New Taylor dreadnoughts feature new bracing, and in this instance, the 610, the bracing is forward shifted x bracing with Taylor's relief route for enhanced sound board flexibility.

  • Dreadnought body size
  • Big Leaf Maple back and sides
  • Sitka spruce top
  • All solid wood construction
  • Taylor Expression System electronics (optional)
  • Venetian cutaway (optional)
  • Tusq nut and saddle
  • 1 3/4' neck width at the nut
  • Hard rock maple neck/heel
  • Ebony fretboard
  • Twisted ovals positioning markers
  • Ebony headstock overlay
  • Ebony bridge pins with abalone dots
  • Taylor gold tuners
  • Ebony truss rod cover
  • Gloss finish (back and sides)
  • Gloss top finish
  • Abalone rosette 
  • Taylor mother of pearl peghead inlay
  • Taylor deluxe hard shell case

Taylor 610 With Quilted Maple

610 quilted maple
Credit: http://www.no-bozos.com/Taylor610Quilted.html

Very Nice Demonstration Of The Taylor 610 Sound!

These maple bodied guitars such as the Taylor 610 are not the most in demand instruments.  Most people just gravitate towards rosewood bodies.  What this all means is the 610 is available used for some amazingly low prices considering the quality of the instrument.  If you're the sort of musician who wants to have an instrument which not only looks different than the rest of the crowd, but also sounds different, then it could be a guitar such as the Taylor 610 is the ultimate guitar for you.  My standard advice is always the same, and that is you should play as many guitars as you can within your price range, and simply go with what feels and sounds best to  you.  Thanks for reading.

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