Login
Password

Forgot your password?

Tight End(TE) and Full Back(FB) stance, technique, and drills

By Edited Aug 21, 2016 0 0

Stance

TE- Tight ends are typically in a three point stance. The only exception to this is when they are in a two point in a flex formation. The TE's three point should be something that is comfortable. The weight distribution should be close to 50/50 with a little more weight being on the feet. The Back should be close to flat making sure their head is up.

Fullbacks (2 or 3 Point) A fullback's stance starts with the feet parallel to the line of scrimmage, no wider than the player's shoulders. There should be a slight bend in the knees; the back should be straight, with the shoulders slightly in front of the player's feet. Hands should be on the player's knees. The players head needs to be up to give good vision, with his chest and neck bowed.

Flex or WR stance- This will be a two point sprinters stance. The Inside foot should always be forward. There should be 8-12 inches separating your two feet keeping while still being comfortable. Your front leg should carry about 70% of the weight while your back leg holds the remaining 30%.

Alignment

TE Flex- (refer to receiver alignments page in playbook) If ball is in the middle of the field then you are two yards outside the hash. If ball is on the hash then you are on the opposite hash. TE's are always on the line of scrimmage.

 

FB- There are several base alignments that H's will use. Note: All alignments can change depending on defensive alignment, play, and game plan adjustments

 Man in Motion

 Many of the plays in our offense will be run with a man in motion.  Motion is defined as the movement of one player parallel to the LOS as the ball is snapped.  Having the ability to use a man in motion allows us to stay simple in our offensive package, but yet give the appearance of being very multiple in the use of our formations.  Secondly, it puts added pressure on the defense because motion, in effect, changes the strength of the offensive formation.  Finally, motion can be used as one way to determine man or zone coverage by the defensive secondary.

 One very important reminder is that everyone must be stationary for one second before anyone can go in motion.  This means that all offensive players must be set for one full count from the time the quarterback sets the formation, or the time the linemen adjust their splits or the time a player shifts.  Because of this we should not shift on plays where a player will go in motion and the motion should not begin until at least the color call in the quarterback’s cadence.

 Secondly, it needs to be understood that only one player can be in motion at a time.   This means moving when the ball is snapped.  Two or more players moving at once is considered a shift and everyone must reset for the one count before the ball is snapped.  Also it is important that the player in motion be aligned in the backfield.  A player on the LOS can not go in motion, unless he has shifted back off the LOS and been set for the one count first.   Finally, the man in motion must be working parallel to the LOS when the ball is snapped.  In other words, the man in motion can not be angling toward the LOS or turn up field before the ball is snapped.

 Approaching the LOS

 

  • Before the huddle begins:  FORGET the last play

 

1)   Alignment (side of the ball, split, motion, etc)

2)   Assignment (responsibility and rules of the play)

3)   Action (how to do it)

4)   Adjustment (Cover 0, zone, press, blocking assignment)

  •  Go through the play 1 time in your head:  SEE THE BIG PICTURE

 Reading Coverage at the LOS (EYES)

  • Before you “start” or release off the line, it’s imperative that wide receivers become comfortable in reading coverage before the snap of the ball.
  • As you lock yourself in your stance, scan the defense with your eyes.  There are 3 key reads that are easy pre-snap reads.
    1. Safeties.
    2. Defender over you.
    3. Coverage shell. 
  • After reading the coverage, it is imperative that you call it out loud enough for the quarterback to hear you. This not only helps the quarterback, but also ensures that we are all on the same page.

 

Special Tips:

  • EYES OF THE DEFENDER:  If the defender is looking directly at the receiver, it’s probably man coverage.  Eyes of the defender into the quarterback, it’s probably zone.
  • ALIGNMENT:  Defender has inside leverage to receiver, MAN.  Outside leverage to receiver, ZONE.
  • DEPTH:  may align closer if man coverage, deeper if zone (cover 3).

 *If you are having trouble reading coverage listen to the receivers they are calling it out each play.

 Reading Coverage at the LOS (EYES)

  • Before you “start” or release off the line, it’s imperative that wide receivers become comfortable in reading coverage before the snap of the ball.
  • As you lock yourself in your stance, scan the defense with your eyes.  There are 3 key reads that are easy pre-snap reads.
    1. Safeties.
    2. Defender over you.
    3. Coverage shell. 
  • After reading the coverage, it is imperative that you call it out loud enough for the quarterback to hear you. This not only helps the quarterback, but also ensures that we are all on the same page.

Special Tips:

  • EYES OF THE DEFENDER:  If the defender is looking directly at the receiver, it’s probably man coverage.  Eyes of the defender into the quarterback, it’s probably zone.
  • ALIGNMENT:  Defender has inside leverage to receiver, MAN.  Outside leverage to receiver, ZONE.
  • DEPTH:  may align closer if man coverage, deeper if zone (cover 3).

*If you are having trouble reading coverage listen to the receivers they are calling it out each play.

-Releases-

Outside (TE)

Step with outside foot while grabbing for defensive players outside hand with your outside hand. Violently throw defensive players hand down pulling yourself forward and outside. Your second step should be with your inside foot straight up field past the defender. On your second step rip with your inside arm. Try and stack yourself on top of defenders position to avoid any further contact.

Inside (TE)

Step with inside foot while grabbing for defensive players inside hand with your inside hand. Violently throw defensive players hand down pulling yourself forward and inside. Your second step should be with your outside foot straight up field past the defender. On your second step rip with your outside arm. Try and stack yourself on top of defenders position to avoid any further contact.

Jab Opposite Outside

Step with the inside foot grabbing the defensive players outside hand with your outside hand. Then step up field with your outside foot ripping through with your inside hand. Try and stack yourself on top of defenders position to avoid any further contact.

Jab Opposite Inside

Step with the outside foot grabbing the defensive players inside hand with your inside hand. Then step up field with your inside foot ripping through with your outside hand. Try and stack yourself on top of defenders position to avoid any further contact.

-Receiving-

Components of a Pass Route

  • A receiver should always stay low off the LOS and continuing on through the route.  “Play low, shoulders down.”
  • Keep the DB’s hands off at all times.
  • Approaching your route break point, reduce the cushion of the defender as much as possible.  Seldom will you ever make a move “on air.”  Attempt to get on the toes of your defender.
  • There should be a strong vertical push on ALL routes. Make the defender think you are beating him deep every time!

BREAK:

  • Body lean remains forward (remain a sprinter).  Use your head and shoulders to “lean” and maximize space for your route.
  • Accelerate out of breaking point for optimal separation.  Throw your elbow through and snap your eyes around to your point of destination, the body will follow.
  • THROW YOUR PLANT FOOT INTO THE “MUD.”  “STICK YOUR ROUTE.”  (Be Emphatic)
  • Get rid of false steps or stutter steps as you break out of your route.
  • DO NOT turn your head until the point of your break.  DO NOT “banana” a route that is not designed to do so.
  • Must be definitive in either going over or under a defender at the break point. Going over the top must be done quickly with little contact so as to gain the necessary separation. Going under must be done with a little more force, utilizing a nice slip move by. The receiver should subtly put his hand on the small of the defender's back and "gently" escort him by.
  • Do not use your hands excessively. If needed, use your forearm to fend off a defender.
  • It is imperative that you "bang the drums" keeping your elbows inside the frame of your body at your breaking point.  DO NOT give the airplane look or stop motion at your break.
  • *Important Note- against 0 high or if you are held up at the LOS because of press coverage, it may be necessary to cut the route down a few yards because of timing.

Drills: 4-cone drill 90s, 4-cone drill 45s, Quick feet circles, S Drill, Stutter W, Star Drill:

WINDOW:

  • Timing in the pass game is very critical. The quarterback and receiver need to be on the same page.
  • As a receiver you need to be familiar with the passing windows of each play.
  • The window is the particular area where the ball needs to be completed.
  • It is vital that the receiver know who he is running his route off of so that the receiver will be in the proper window for a completion. For example, whether the route is being run off of the corner, a linebacker or a safety.
  • It is also important not to be a robot, as a window might close and you may have to adjust on the fly and find the next window. 

Drills: Adjustment drill, Sit down drill:

CATCH:

  • Focus on the point of the football (Imagine there is a string from the tip of the ball to your nose- never break that string!).  Have your hands prepared to receive the football- form the diamond.
  • Catch with your hands. Keep it off the pads.
  • Tuck it away and secure the football immediately.

DRILLS

Hand fight progression:

6 point explosion- Player partner up one being on his knees while the other is in a six point stance. (On his toes, knees, and hands) On the whistle player in the six point cocks his hands then drives through player or sled fully extending his hips to the ground.

            Purpose: This teaches player to get a great punch while working his hips into the block.

Re-punch Drill- Player A starts fitted in and drives player B back until whistle. At whistle player B punches and drives player A back. Repeat

              Purpose: Getting both players to work hard for 10-15 seconds while teaching to re-punch, lower center of gravity, and widen base to get movement.       

Clear the Hands Drill- Player A on offense starts fitted in while player B knocks A's hands off repeatedly.

              Purpose: Get player to get the feel of re-punching after hands get knocked off. Inside hands always wins!

Hand Fight Drill- Two players on their knees work for inside hands on the whistle.

              Purpose: Get used to "fighting" for inside hands. This drill also brings in a little aspect of competition.

 Boards and bags progression:

Board drill- 1st step and hold, 2 steps and hold, waddle.

              Purpose: Get the feel for how to move properly. Keeping an eye on wide base, low center of gravity, and having your head up.

2 step and punch- Player will take first two steps and punch the bag.

Purpose: Taking the first two steps of any block (IZ, OZ, ECT) and making sure to get contact on 2nd step while focusing on inside hands and footwork.                                        

Punch and Drive- Player will take correct steps to contact and drive the bag down the board.

              Purpose: Puts the correct footwork together while driving a defensive player off the line of scrimmage focusing on steps, hips, wide base, and aiming their jam.

Drive plus resistance- Player will take correct steps to contact and drive the bag down the board. The bag will add resistance on the whistle.

Purpose: Puts the correct footwork together while driving a defensive player off the line of scrimmage focusing on steps, hips, wide base, and aiming their jam. Then when resistance is added it makes the offensive player sink hips, re-punch and finish.

Counter progression:

Rip- Drill teaches offensive player how to defeat a rip by pinning the hip and running the defensive player up field.

Swim- Drill teaches offensive player how to defeat a rip by punching under swim arm and running up field.

Spin- Drill teaches offensive player how to defeat a rip by either keeping head out and re-punching or "corkscrewing"

Bull- Drill teaches offensive player how to defeat a rip by stepping back, widening base, and re-punching.

              Purpose: Teach players correct way to defeat a defensive player's move. If done correctly and enough times this should become second nature and will start happening automatically on the game field.

Mirror then counter- Offensive player will mirror defensive player until whistle. Then defensive player will pick a side and try to beat the offensive player up field using one of the four counters. Offensive player will then "counter" defensive players move.

              Purpose: Teaches offensive players to mirror by moving his feet and then react to a defensive players move.

Disadvantage Drill- Player is out of position on a block and needs to rip, cut, or butt block to stay on block.

              Purpose: Make players feel a little more comfortable in positions they are going to get into in a game. This also allows them to feel what it feels like to use these less practiced blocks.

Cut drill- (rip and roll)

Finish Drill- Offensive player works any block in the playbook for 3 seconds then on the whistle play goes live and offensive player tries to "finish" the block by any means necessary. This could mean actually finishing the defensive player to the ground or just running the player off.

            Purpose: Starts to work on the good habit of getting the offensive player to finish every play to the whistle and trying to snap off every block.

Iso Board Drill- Have defensive player hold a bag half way down the board while the offensive player lines up 4 yards in front of board.

Purpose: This simulates the distance between their alignment and the LB they will be blocking. The board makes sure they break down before they get to the defender and have a wide base. Make sure to emphasize aiming their punch.

Iso Shute- Have defensive player hold a bag under the shute while the offensive player lines up four yards out side of shute.

            Purpose: This simulates the distance between their alignment and a LB they will be blocking. The shute makes sure they break down before they get to the defender and have a wide base. Make sure to emphasize aiming their punch.

Receiving

4-cone drill 90s: Arrange 4 cones in a box about 5 yards apart. Run 90 degree cuts around the cones until you get back to the starting cone. These cuts should be very sharp and the focus should be on getting in and out of the breaks as quickly as possible.

4-cone drill 45s: Same as above, but run 45 degree cuts, by running straight up from the start cone and cutting through the middle after the second cone, straight back after the third cone and back through the middle, ending up at the starting cone. (Path is like a figure 8 or hour glass)

Quick feet circles: Arrange 4 cones in a straight line about 2-3 yards apart. Run straight from cone to cone performing tight circles around each cone. Do this twice through clockwise and then counterclockwise.  

S Drill: Arrange 4 cones in a staggered S shape about 1 yard apart. Make quick rounded cuts at each cone, making sure to turn hips each cut.

Stutter W: Arrange 4 cones in a W shape about 5 yards apart. Run post/corner cuts at each cone.

Star Drill: Arrange 4 cones in a box about 5 yards apart and put the last one directly in the middle. Start from one of the corner cones and make the first cut at the cone in the middle. Continue to make quick cuts in the shape of a figure 8 or hour glass.

*All of the above drills finish with a catch*

Adjustment drill: Receivers form one single file line. Coach plays defender and makes the receiver either sit down in window or move on to next one.

Sit down drill: Two cones are put 7-8 yards apart. Receiver runs to the first cone, breaks down, sits down, and opens up waiting for the ball. If not thrown after a two count, receiver runs back to the first cone and continues process until ball is thrown, catching and turning up field quickly after.

Concentration drill: Two lines of receivers line up about 10 yards apart with one line staggered in front of the other- one is designated as the catching line and the other the distracting line (this line is not allowed to touch the ball!). On cadence, receivers begin to run at each other and the coach throws the ball to the receiver in the receiving line when the two get just about even.

Line Catching: Receivers form a single file line and run straight ahead. The coach throws from their right hand side, then left hand side, and then from straight on.

Bad Ball: Same as previous, just with purposely thrown bad balls.

Goal Post: Players are thrown balls while sticking arms around the goal post- forcing them to catch with their hands.

3 balls and score: Two cones are put about 7-8 yards apart. The receiver runs back and forth catching 3 balls and turning up field to score on the third.

Over shoulder harass: Partnered drill where one is the defender and the other the receiver. The defender should stick their inside arm straight up in the receiver's face. This drill has four different variations: 1) Deep- Receiver creates separation away from defender with sudden burst of speed 2) Fades- Receiver holds the box and fades with the ball 3) Under thrown- Receiver throttles down in order to still catch the ball out front (defender must run through receiver to get to ball) and 4) High Point- Receiver goes up to catch the ball at its highest point.

High Ball: Players get together in groups of three. A high ball is thrown to the middle of the group. The middle receiver is the one making the catch with the other two jumping up and distracting. Players rotate being the middle receiver.   

Hand drills: 

Improving your hands and hand strength should be an ongoing process throughout the season and offseason.  Here are a few we may incorporate at times throughout the year:

1.  Catching tennis balls 2.  Around the world (around back)

3.  Figure 8 (thru legs) 4. Flip up (on back of hand) 5. Drop and around (thru legs) 6. Toss ups (catch with one hand in mid-air)

Advertisement

Comments

Add a new comment - No HTML
You must be logged in and verified to post a comment. Please log in or sign up to comment.

Explore InfoBarrel

Auto Business & Money Entertainment Environment Health History Home & Garden InfoBarrel University Lifestyle Sports Technology Travel & Places
© Copyright 2008 - 2016 by Hinzie Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap

Follow IB Sports