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United States Wheat Cents Pick A Hundred Thousand Dollar Coin From Pocket Change

By Edited Jul 15, 2016 4 6

The general population should be alerted to some very valuable United States Wheat Cents that may be in their pockets, at this very moment.

This series of one cent coins was originally issued in 1909. The US Mint was ordered by Congress to come up with a design to replace the famous Indian Head cent. The time had come to honor one of our most illustrious and well known presidents, Abraham Lincoln, with a likeness of him on our copper cent.

These wheat ears show America's crop of the day. Wheat was the largest export from the United States at the time and was rightly used as the reverse logo on these coins.

Wheat cents, in general, are a very common item. Most dates can be had in very high grade for a few dollars. There are however certain exceptions to that rule.

Below I'm going to outline some of these oddities and their respective values. When you're finished reading this article, I guarantee you'll be checking your pocket change every time for these rarities.

The most famous wheat cent and this one is a double die strike. It happened in 1955. Most of you have probably heard of this error coin but I am including it because of the recent jump in price.

1955 double die, United States Wheat Cent updated value in MS 65, (The scale for these coin's runs from 0 to 70, 70 being a perfect example.)From PCGS---$40,000.

This coin is easily recognized, the date showing radical doubling, as well as doubling of the motto's On the entire obverse of the coin.

In contrast to the high grade example, a slightly worn 50 coin, (again on the 0 to 70 scale) will come in at around $1,000. Still not a bad find if one shows up in your pocket from the grocer.

The next cent you should watch for is the very short mintage of the 1914-D United States Wheat Cent. With slightly over a million struck 96 years ago, very few of these have been found in recent years.

1914-D, United States Wheat Cent Updated value in MS 65, from PCGS, $30,000

Another great find to turn up in your old piggy bank.

There was another minor error that occurred at the US mint in the year 1922. It seems that a certain mint worker was very frugal and continued to polish a 1922-D die so much that with extensive use on what showed to be too many strikes, the D was inadvertently polished away.

Denver being the only mint that struck cents in 1922, no cents should exist, without a D mint mark from this year.

This action seceded at creating first a coin known as the 1922 weak D and then later in it's very shiny life, the 1922 plain.

Shortly thereafter, the mistake was noticed and the die was replaced with a new die. Very few of these coins were produced before the mistake was caught. Creating one of the cherry pick-able coins, out their today.

1922-D Plain (No D) United States Wheat Cent Updated value in MS 65, from PCGS, $100,000

Nothing to sneeze at for a coin that could be in that big jug of cents in the closet somewhere. A slightly worn example carrying a grade of 40 would still sell for around 2600 dollars.

The next coin on this list will be the first mint marked coin in the series. This coin also carried the initials V.D.B, for the designer, Victor D. Brenner. These initials are on the reverse at the very bottom of the coin. This year is the only year to carry these initials in this location.

The San Fransico Mint struck a measly 1.8 million of these and compared with all other years this is truly a minuscule amount.

We're looking for a 1909-S VDB United States Wheat Cent, Updated value in MS 67, from PCGS, $100,000

This price is for the only MS 67 example known, so finding one in pocket change in this condition is unlikely at best. A slightly lesser graded coin at MS 65 would bring a nifty $9,000.

There are many other coins within this series that can run up wards of $50,000. When searching for these rarities Suggested accompanying price guide would be the red book. This is readily available from amazon.com or any of the larger book stores. It may also be obtained at any coin shop or numismatic Establishment.

The online source for coin prices today is PCGS.com. Their website is very informational. Membership can be acquired for a monthly fee for even more information. There is a free price guide available there.

Checking all of your wheat cents for special years and double dies, is a good practice to get into. If you happen to be very lucky, you may just get an unexpected boost in your income bracket.

Another good source to find out exactly what a coin is worth is eBay. Open any eBay window and type the coin you have into the search box. Immediately the list will come up with all items that match your search. you can then watch several of these and get an idea of what price your coin may realize.

Ebay also has an option to check past sales for any item. This may be a quicker way if you would like your self appraisal fast.

United States Wheat Cents Pick A Hundred Thousand Dollar Coin From Pocket Change is no fake out. These coins exist and they're found every day. People experience large financial gains from this cherry picking of pocket change, when they know what their looking for.



Nov 12, 2010 5:22pm
I'm psyched about this info. My husband has been collecting for years, but not pennies. I'm fwding this article to a daughter who does have a jug of coins! Great share.
Nov 12, 2010 6:36pm
Great I hope you get the find of the century, make sure to get a redbook there are many other less known valuable cents. Thanks for looking.
Nov 12, 2010 9:15pm
My dad used to pay us 2 cents for every wheat penny we would find and bring to him. Somewhere there has to be a jar of hundreds of wheat pennies in it.
Nov 12, 2010 9:48pm
Thats where most of these finds come from Usually the bottom of that jar that was began in the teens when our grandparents started to throw their change in a jar. The silver gets spent leaving behind the real hidden treasure.
Nov 22, 2010 10:44am
I have about 750 old wheat backs and I am going to look through them for any of these. I doubt I have any of the valuable ones but ya' never know.
Nov 26, 2010 6:46pm
Hope you have a good coin book ernie, or you can go to PCGS.com for prices.
Good luck!
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