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Useful Resources for Dog Owners - Epilepsy, Cancer and Arthritis in Dogs

By Edited Jun 16, 2016 0 0

Are seizures in dogs dangerous?

For someone with epilepsy, I can understand how seizures in dogs can become incredibly frustrating to the animal. There is nothing worse than waking up and not knowing where you are or being in a state where you are just not yourself.

Basically, this happens because of some dysfunction in the neurological system and this is where you will see your dog going into a convulsion. It is not a pretty site and it can be really upsetting, especially for those close to the dog or for small children.

Fortunately, it can be controlled with the right medication. However, you have to find something that is going to be right for you dog. There are lots of different types of seizures that a dog can have. For example, an absence seizure will be a lot milder than a grand mal seizure.

If your dog has been diagnosed with epilepsy, then you will discover that there are certain times that he is more likely to have a seizure. It could be that he is stressed or excited. This is important to look into because this is a way of bringing it on and avoiding it all together.

What happens?

It really varies, depending on how severe the case is. Usually your dog will behave somewhat out of the ordinary. He may hide, begin to salivate or start to shake. These are things to watch out for. This is known as the pre-ictal phase.

When we move onto the ictal phase, you will find that a convulsion can last up to five minutes, depending on the type. At the post-ictal phase, the dog will wake up, not knowing where he is, so show some compassion. Give it a lot of attention.

Are seizures dangerous in dogs?

If they are controlled with medication, dogs will be happy as any other animal on this planet. However, when and if you see that your dog is convulsing for more than 5 minutes or has not fully recovered yet, then it is time to start to worry. If another seizure develops, then you have to get your dog off to the vet. This could be status epileptics and this is a dangerous condition.

Sometimes, a dog with this condition does not even have to go on any anticonvulsant. Often a dog will have only one seizure, so this is really nothing to worry about. It is only when a dog has a series of attacks that you would need to medicate it.

Something like Phenobarbital, which is also given to humans, is a popular choice for dogs. One can also combine the drug with something else, but this is all up to the vet to decide, as it depends on the type of epilepsy as well as the severity. Sometimes you just need to experiment. Once this is started, it must be used on a regular basis, so it is important that the owner is strict about the dose because a skipped dose would mean that the dog would be at greater risk.


Finding a Diet for Cancer in Dogs

Finding out that your dog has cancer, is probably one of the worst things that can happen to you. It is not something that you expect to find out. We so often hear of a family member or a friend coming into contact with the dreaded disease, but it does not necessarily always strike us that a dog should also suffer like this.

However, if you catch the warning signs, you may find that you can do something to prevent it from coming back. It is often older dogs that come into contact with this, but it has probably been building up for years, so it is always a tricky one. However, vets are very good at treating cancer in dogs and your dog may be one of the fortunate ones.

One of the most important aspects of any type of cancer is diet. Anyone who has been through this ordeal would know that going back to a diet filled of fast food and processed snacks is definitely not the right way to go. At the end of the day, it all comes down to diet.

Whether you dog has been diagnosed with little chance of survival or you have found that there is a great chance that you are going to get many happy years left with your best friends, focusing on diet is high up on the agenda.

dog with cancer

What a diet for cancer in dogs should consist of:

This is where you should ditch any processed dog food and treats and take the effort to make your own. Basically, a good variety of vegetables with a protein source of chicken is going to give your dog a good source of nutrition. Things like celery, potatoes and zucchinis are going to go down very well.

Natural sugars come in the form of veggies like pumpkin, carrots as well as fruit, but don’t overdo the fruit. They will need glucose on occasion, but it is definitely worth looking into the cancer starving diet as well.

This diet deals with restricting the amount of glucose you provide your dog with. Cancer cells need glucose to survive, so many doctors and vets alike, believe that starving cells of glucose does help.

You can also use supplements, which will give a boost, such as Omega 3. You can ask your vet about this because there are a lot of different brands, suited to different breeds and it also depends on the severity of the cancer.

The only type of pet food I would buy would be Hill’s pet nutrition, especially since they have introduced the Hill’s prescription diet. This is for dogs that are having some form of cancer treatment and it is supposed increase the survival time, whilst not decreasing the quality of life.

In fact it has actually been proven that dogs seem to be happier, just by looking at their behavior. A lot of research went into producing the formula at a special oncology unit so it definitely shouldn’t be glossed over.

Young dogs with arthritis

It is painful enough seeing an older dog with arthritis limping about, but it doesn’t seem right that a young dog should be affected so soon. You can understand why a big dog like a Labrador develops this condition, especially where weight is an issue. However, if your dog is barely a year old, it is more complex.

However, you will be surprised how often this does occur. After an accident or some sort of injury, the effects are left behind. Hip dysplasia can happen at any age, but it is usually the bigger breeds that this happens with. You may find that younger dogs that are fat and are inactive will become arthritic; however, this is not common.

It is important to pick up the symptoms early on. It is a lot easier to see these signs when you still have a puppy because they are usually active and so when you start to see that he prefers to sit or lie down a lot more, you need to be aware. He may also prefer to lean on one side.

dog with arthritis

The best way to get the proper results is through an x-ray. You have to have a thorough examination. A lot of people just leave this and this is the worst thing you can do because it can be incredibly frustrating and uncomfortable for the dog. The pain will just become worse, and it is especially important to pay attention to this if your dog develops the condition early on in life.

Start off with a good diet, even before you realize your dog has arthritis. Dogs that are more prone to this may do better if they start off their lives on a well-balanced diet. Unfortunately, it is often in the genes so there is not much you can do about that.

You can find pain medication for arthritis in dogs as well as things you can do to provide comfort. There are some great natural remedies, which you can make up yourself or buy. You can press the pressure points every so often. This is going to ease the pain. However, as time has gone by, improvements have been made with medication and you will find that this is a big help.

Glucosamine is a natural supplement that can be added to the food. It has anti-inflammatory properties and it is very powerful for arthritis. Also look out for chondroitin as well as MSM because they will definitely help with the pain. However, don’t test and experiment with this before consulting with your vet, who will advise you on the best route to take.

Always be watching the weight of your dog because this plays a major role. It puts a lot of pressure on the joints and eventually the animal will find it difficult to move around. You may feel sorry for your lovely lab because of the fact that you can’t give him an extra treat, but think of what it will be doing to him in the long run.



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