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What The U.S Can Learn From Asian Rearing Practises Part 1

By Edited Nov 20, 2016 0 0

Introduction

The intent of this article is to discuss the efficacy of Asian child rearing practices, in particular those of Indian and Chinese parents, and the impact to the United States’ economy. This article has breen broken up into 5 seperate parts. Hopefully, you will be able to read them all. In this article, research will reveal that as a nation of immigrants, the country benefits from the toil and ingenuity of new comers. In addition, this researcher depicts how utilizing the shared principles of Indian and Chinese parents, in particular their emphasis on education, focus and effort can yield positive outcomes for future employees and employers. Workers will strive for success but do so in a sustained manner, thereby limiting drastic financial dips and unemployment. In an age of Facebook, Twitter and the like, there is a change in expectations, societal norms, behavior and attitude. These changes are apparent in the current recession that started in 2007. Unemployment is at 8.8% in March 2011 which is a reduction of past rates. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, database/tools tab denotes a chart that clearly illuminates this fact. [5244]

 

 

 

Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

2001

4.2

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.3

4.5

4.6

4.9

5.0

5.3

5.5

5.7

 

2002

5.7

5.7

5.7

5.9

5.8

5.8

5.8

5.7

5.7

5.7

5.9

6.0

 

2003

5.8

5.9

5.9

6.0

6.1

6.3

6.2

6.1

6.1

6.0

5.8

5.7

 

2004

5.7

5.6

5.8

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.5

5.4

5.4

5.5

5.4

5.4

 

2005

5.3

5.4

5.2

5.2

5.1

5.0

5.0

4.9

5.0

5.0

5.0

4.9

 

2006

4.7

4.8

4.7

4.7

4.6

4.6

4.7

4.7

4.5

4.4

4.5

4.4

 

2007

4.6

4.5

4.4

4.5

4.4

4.6

4.7

4.6

4.7

4.7

4.7

5.0

 

2008

5.0

4.8

5.1

4.9

5.4

5.6

5.8

6.1

6.2

6.6

6.8

7.3

 

2009

7.8

8.2

8.6

8.9

9.4

9.5

9.5

9.7

9.8

10.1

9.9

9.9

 

2010

9.7

9.7

9.7

9.8

9.6

9.5

9.5

9.6

9.6

9.7

9.8

9.4

 

2011

9.0

8.9

8.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Focus on this particular group of Asian immigrants, Indians, is appropriate as they are the most recent wave to come to the country. Research reveals that they are usually skilled, educated, and have a high financial success rate. Thus, being able to tap into this foreign-born segment of the population, can provide insight on motivation and construct programs to engage the next generations of workers. As noted, the United States is a country of immigrants, but the drive, vision and sacrifice of past generations are not at the forefront in current standards. This researcher will argue the benefits of inciting such a dialogue and change in standard to assist the country in improving its present financial doldrums.

 

The genesis for the topic came about primarily due to an excerpt from a conference held at Brown University, March 2009. The conference titled “The Immigrant Paradox in Education and Behavior: Is becoming an American a developmental risk?” With data citing over 2 million jobs lost to outsourcing in 20091, the question bears asking, “ How does the U.S. retain jobs?” The sociologist and social workers attending the conference provided facts on the impact of assimilation, namely a deterioration of academic achievement. Their research revealed that future generations do not have the same ties to the foreign-born experience. This creates a paradox. As the U.S labor force faces trials: insufficient skilled labor at affordable rates, a workforce that has limited focus and stricture on creativity, the desire to find a solution and improve the skills of the U.S labor market is critical. While the woes cited do not pertain to all jobs, evidence exists that there is a cultural shift in how workers view their employment and the level of effort to perform the job.

 

Thus, an analysis of the country’s immigrant roots and the core values of immigrants can lead to a theory on how the work-force can be re-energized; thereby, retaining jobs and creating new opportunities for national growth. The fact that other nations seek employees from the U.S. with knowledge and skill, affords the U.S. other areas of expansion and export. The reality is that America will always be a magnet for immigrants. George Borjas in his paper on “Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market?” (2001) suggests that “new immigrants make up a disproportionately large fraction of the “marginal” workers who chase better economic opportunities and help equalize opportunities across areas. The data also suggests that wage convergence across geographic regions is faster during high-immigration periods. As a result, immigrant flows into the United States may play an important role in improving labor market efficiency.”

 

The essential idea remains; how can learning from the new Asian immigrants of Indian descent and the existing Chinese population, who are culturally steeped in education, help and guide the country towards meaningful and sustained success? The results of this researcher’s survey, provide some insight into the impact education has on the children of foreign-born citizens.

 

This paper is segmented into four parts. Part one is a historical perspective of immigration. It will highlight the various waves of immigrants, their contributions, enacted immigration laws and the overall impact to the economy. This thesis does not delve into the issue of illegal or refugee migration. The subject is extensive and certainly warrants analysis in and of itself. The second part depicts the country’s present economic state and cites the government’s projections on employment into the next decade. While the United States has engaged in considerable outsourcing, the data herein does not examine this aspect in detail. Review of the impact is worthy of its own independent study.

 

The third section details the surveys conducted with Asian parents and first and second generation Asian children. The questions are cited and results revealed. The final section is this researchers’ conclusions that utilizing Asian parents’ focus on education will yield an improved workforce which will spur innovation and provide the country with qualified workers. This will benefit corporations within the US and expand opportunities for US personnel overseas.

 

By no means is this a panacea for the unprecedented financial strains on the U.S. This researcher’s information on immigrant values can initiate a dialogue on why and how the United States should balance personal rights and freedoms with the need to keep the country on a forward trajectory. The tales of sacrifice of every immigrant group is an opportunity for the nation to re-examine the path to success. While wealth and fame are the usual markers, can success be defined more in terms of an employed population with a strong collective bond for personal and the country’s financial achievement? The United States debt as of April 14, 2011 per the U.S. Treasury website[5245]

Current

Debt Held by the Public

Intragovernmental Holdings

Total Public Debt Outstanding

04/14/2011

9,657,636,099,303.31

4,613,156,019,881.58

14,270,792,119,184.89

 

 

April 13, 2001:

Date

Debt Held by the Public

Intragovernmental Holdings

Total Public Debt Outstanding

04/13/2001

Not Available

Not Available

5,768,256,399,246.51

 

January 4, 1993 (earliest dates the site records the debt)

Date

Debt Held by the Public

Intragovernmental Holdings

Total Public Debt Outstanding

01/04/1993

Not Available

Not Available

4,167,872,986,583.67

 

A query often posed is what is the difference between the debt and deficit. Here is a direct quote from the Treasure website:

“What is the difference between the debt and the deficit?

The deficit is the fiscal year difference between what the United States Government (Government) takes in from taxes and other revenues, called receipts, and the amount of money the Government spends, called outlays. The items included in the deficit are considered either on-budget or off-budget.

You can think of the total debt as accumulated deficits plus accumulated off-budget surpluses. The on-budget deficits require the U.S. Treasury to borrow money to raise cash needed to keep the Government operating. We borrow the money by selling securities like Treasury bills, notes, bonds and savings bonds to the public.

The Treasury securities issued to the public and to the Government Trust Funds (Intragovernmental Holdings) then become part of the total debt. For information about the deficit, visit the Financial Management Service web site to view the Monthly Treasury Statement of Receipts and Outlays of the United States Government (MTS).”

All the numbers above are from the same government website and should alarm the citizens of these United States as to the growth of the debt. Thus, the topic of an employed labor force and sustained economic growth, have enormous relevance. Learning from recent immigrants and recalling the efforts of past newcomers to the land, will enable the ensuing discussion to be robust and candid, thereby putting personal agendas aside for the greater good of the country.

1 www.numberof.net?number-of-jobs-outsourced-in-the-us-in-2009

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Bibliography

  1. "BLS.Gov." BLS.Gov. 01/March/2011 <Web >
  2. "Debt." Tresury Direct. 14/April/2011 <Web >

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