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Wonder Woman's Most Bizarre Villains

By Edited Sep 16, 2016 0 0

The Many Strange Enemies of Wonder Woman

A Wild Rogues Gallery

In more than 70s of publication, the character of Wonder Woman, also known as Princess Diana of Themyscira, has amassed quite a collection of enemies in her many adventures. This has been true ever since the princess first won the contest to see which Amazon would travel to Man's World and spread a message of peace. It was in these initial travels that Wonder Woman met her first major villain: Ares, the God of War. Ares was soon followed by many other nasty antagonists for Wonder Woman to fight, including the Cheetah, Doctor Poison, and Giganta.

But this is a list not of the absolute greatest foes of Wonder Woman. Instead it is a compilation of some of the strangest and downright bizarre foes that the Amazon Princess has ever had to fight. And that is a list that simply has to start with...

Egg Fu

Serving Doomsday Sunny Side Up

When Egg Fu originally appeared in Wonder Woman issue no. 157 (October, 1965), the egg-shaped monstrosity was presented as an artifact created by the Communist Chinese, and used as a means to threaten the West with a doomsday rocket. That may not be the most culturally sensitive approach to inventing a supervillain, so Egg Fu was eventually redesigned and repurposed when the villain was used again in the 1990s. When he showed up again, Egg Fu was a supercomputer disguised as a carnival attraction at the Oceanside boardwalk in Gateway City. Any amusement park attendees who stepped inside the sinister egg-shaped attraction were unwittingly teleported to the brutal planet of Apokolips, to serve as war-slaves for Darkseid. It probably goes without saying, but this egg is no yolk.

Angle Man

Always Looking For The Angle

Angelo Bend was a thief who first appeared in Wonder Woman issue no. 179 (May 2002), and this stylish criminal would never be caught dead in a hokey spandex jumpsuit or spouting his world domination plans in a hackneyed soliloquy. Instead, he preferred tailored suits and a cool demeanor. Perhaps what helped Bend, also known as the Angle Man, maintain his cool even in the face of danger was a unique triangular device that allowed him to distort any surrounding spatial relationships. But the ability to teleport and disorient those around him would not be enough to keep Angle Man from eventually being mangled at the claws of the wicked Cheetah, all over the acquisition of a shard known as the Avatar of Tisiphone. If we've said it once, we've said it a million times: there's no right angle when it comes to crime.

Devastation

The Cutest Little Baby-Face

Despite her innocent face, the 12 year-old girl known as Devastation is one seriously alarming foe. This shape-changing child is the daughter of the mad Titan Cronus, and thus a legacy enemy to the Gods of Olympus and Wonder Woman. She also has something in common with Princess Diana, since Devastation was formed from the same clay that formed Diana. But whereas Diana was always destined to bring peace to others, Devastation was formed with the intention of spreading chaos and destruction upon the Earth.

Devastation was also endowed with powers of Cronus' other children, including the cunning of Arch, the emotional manipulation of Disdain, the swiftness of Harrier, and the killing eye of Slaughter. All in all, Devastation is definitely the toughest 12 year-old Wonder Woman has ever fought.

The Crimson Centipede

If He Wins, It's Humiliating

Like Egg Fu, the Crimson Centipede is another wacky villain from the 1960s. Unlike Egg Fu, we have not seen the daring return of the Crimson Centipede anytime in the last 50 years. This weird green-skinned insect actually looks more like a man than an insect, except he has a dozen arms and legs, a red jumpsuit, and a green hue that practically announces this dude is from Mars. The Crimson Centipede was actually created by the war god Mars (an antecedent to the modern era's Ares) in an effort to humiliate Wonder Woman.

The humiliation happened in issue no. 169 (April 1967), when CC began robbing banks just to show that he could, and then swatting at Wonder Woman with a dozen arms when she tried to stop him. Then he swatted her with four more arms, for a total of 16 arm swats. Picking up the convenient number of 16 available guns, CC fired 16 simultaneous pistol shots at Wonder Woman, who deflected every one of them with her magic bracelets, and then proceeded to knock out the obnoxious bug. Almost 50 years later, we say this guy is just about due for a reappearance.

The Glop

Li'l Ole Gooey Monster Me!

As a young girl, Wonder Woman had some pretty strange dreams. How else could you explain the existence of the Glop, a gooey villain that Wonder Girl fought in a nightmare? The liquefied orange Glop was able to assume the form of whatever it ate, almost like some kind of strange alien blob. The Glop ate bombs and rockets, seeking to cause destruction with those devices, but it also managed to eat a bunch of rock and roll records, and seemed to develop a crush on Wonder Girl besides that.

Wonder Girl eventually defeated the Glop the only way that makes sense in a dream: she turned herself into a time machine and hurled herself at the Glop, which then absorbed time machine characteristics and time-traveled to the distant past, where it could do no one any harm. The perfect plan. 

Not Even the Tip of the Iceberg

Wonder Woman's Endless Supply of Bizarre Foes

As wild and wacky as some of the villains on this list are, these five do not even scratch the surface of Wonder Woman's many bizarre foes. If you know of any others worth mentioning, or your favorite bizarre villain got left out, leave a comment below. Also, be sure to check out this handy guide to the many different versions of Wonder Woman that have been published over the years.

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Bibliography

  1. Phil Jimenez and John Wells The Essential Wonder Woman Encyclopedia. New York: Random House, 2010.
  2. Scott Beatty Wonder Woman: The Ultimate Guide to the Amazon Princess. New York: DK, 2003.

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