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Beat Wow Addiction

By Edited Dec 17, 2015 0 0

As a past addict I know what you might be going through right now, I was where you are, at a crossroads wanting to quit but at the same time not wanting to. A friend first introduced me to WoW back when I was 15. When I first started playing, the game didn’t hold much interest yet I logged on everyday so I could talk to my friend. I created a paladin and eventually started playing more on my own and soon enough I’d find myself unable to sleep, waking up at 3 am to play. At school I was a very accomplished student, the best in my group of friends, however the life I led was fairly plain.  Contrast this to WoW where I had the best gear & knew how to make mountains of gold on the auction house. I was powerful, one of the best on server.  I became so good at the game that I routinely beat the friend of mine who introduced me to WoW. It felt great, I felt like I had truly accomplished something.

Then exams were a few months away and I could see that if I didn’t stop, I’d destroy my future.  I made the decision to leave everything. It was hard, but I deleted every one of my characters. I thank god everyday that I did, reading other people’s wow addiction stories online helped me realise I had to stop before I damaged my life irreversibly.

But once again I find myself with some free time, and again WoW lures me back in. I was on the verge of relapsing, I was looking up all the updates and changes to the paladin class. Then I thought no... and started thinking about  why WoW is so addicting

Why is WoW so addicting.  

I’m just going take a crazy guess and assume that if you’re addicted to world of warcraft, you play world of warcraft. So you’ll understand when I tell you that WoW, provides you with these advantages.

Hard work

 “What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for some goal worthy of him.” This elegant quote by Viktor E. Frankl summarises something that might sound absurd at first, our deep desire is to work hard for some goal we yearn for.

Yes, you want to work hard towards something, but something worthwhile! Think of it, have you ever struggled for something and then finally gotten it? How sweet was your reward! World of Warcraft was created based on this simple truism.

Think about how hard it was to get enough gold to finally get to use mounts, or the ridiculous amounts of raids you need to do for top tier gear? WoW allows you to work hard towards your nonexistent goals which make getting them even sweeter.  


And how does having all those amazing mounts and all that awesome gear feel. It’s great is it not? You can easily compare your gearscore to another player’s and smile in the satisfaction that you’re better. WoW allows you to feel a sense of achievement because despite the reward being virtual, you “worked hard” for it.

When you just begin WoW you’re rewarded thick and fast! How fast can you level up and have access to your first mount and better spells in the beginning, pretty quickly right? Yet towards the end the game feels like work... forcing you to carry on. Rewards are set up to keep you addicted. Imagine how bad it would be if you only gained one spell and got all the rest at level 85? You probably wouldn’t bother playing WoW. Blizzard wants you to be addicted. They’re using that weakness, exploiting you to keep you paying.

Knowing that how do you overcome your addictions

Real life is much more like WoW than you may think. Whilst the point isn’t to routinely murder animals which somehow carry weapons and armour. What prevented me from having a relapse into wow was a very simple thought... I want this to be my epic mount. 

My epic mount

Then it hit me, real life is exactly like wow. What mount you have determines how you’re seen, not on the server, but by everyone.

At the time the biggest thing was having T6 armor, when players saw you in tier 6 you could almost feel the admiration from others. It exists in real life! A Gucci suit or Armani jeans, can make all the difference in how people see you.

The reason world of warcraft is so addicting is because real life doesn’t offer you the same sense of achievement as quickly the game does. The rewards system is set up all wrong, you need to work for a long time to finally be rewarded at the end.

Levelling up skills? Everyday I go to the gym I’m levelling up. Chances are sitting at a computer’s gotten you fairly out of shape, read through this and join me! http://www.infobarrel.com/get_a_six_pack

If you miss the social aspect of WoW, remember if you do choose to take up the quest of improving yourself you will join a few guilds. The fitness community is a guild; a lot of people help each other towards their goals, just like you do in raids. When you join a gym you’ll notice there’s a kinship between everyone there, you may talk to them or not, but most will be glad to help you.

It doesn’t end there, it’s not just fitness, any skill you choose to level up, will give you an opportunity to meet new people, whether it’s self defence or learning a new language.

Whenever you have ONE brief moment of willpower, the 5 mins you can break through. Go destroy your account. I took an almost perverse pleasure sticking it to the addicted side of me as I uninstalled the game.

I’m making gold simply from writing this article. Why not start too?

Follow my link http://www.infobarrel.com/signup.php?ref_id=1730649



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