Log into InfoBarrel
Forgot your password?
Need an account?
What do you want to see?
Health
by RoseWrites
1 week ago
100 shares
Mosquito Bed Nets Should Be Recommended by Public Health Authorities

Looks like our public health authorities (WHO, CDC, NIH, and Health Canada) are failing to recommend mosquito bed nets to the public despite the fact that (at least) six research teams have found nighttime-active Culex spp. to be Zika vectors. I've been alerting the Canadian government since 2016. But, mainstream media and those employed to protect human health are dead silent. And, it's not only mosquitoes we have to worry about. Ticks are becoming a worrisome vector of diseases in North America. This week, I found a mosquito bed net that I felt was worthy enough to share with you. Those who sleep outdoors should consider this one.

Health
by RoseWrites
2 months ago
100 shares
Dr. Francis M. Jiggins: You Asked, "How Does Wolbachia Do What It Does?"

For almost two years, I've been researching Zika. After writing about seven or eight articles, I came to the conclusion that Wolbachia is the unspoken co-factor. Recently, I found a paper by Dr. Francis M. Jiggins that openly asks: "How does Wolbachia do what it does?" And, I decided to compile answers (or partial answers) to what he is rightfully questioning. And, it's refreshing that someone in the scientific community is curious because what we are told is helping our dengue and Zika outbreaks (Wolbachia-infected Aedes releases) is ACTUALLY crashing crucial ecosystems and causing human illnesses.

Health
by RoseWrites
3 months ago
100 shares
Is it Group A Strep or Wolbachia (Rickettsial Bacteria)?

It's becoming clear to me that mainstream media is playing a huge role in keeping the public and physicians in the dark. Wolbachia pipientis has been (knowingly) introduced into our food chain since 2009 - although the technology has been worked on for over 20 years. Wolbachia targets the brain, spinal cord, nerves (including the nerves to the stomach and intestines), muscles, gonads, lungs, kidneys, heart, liver, eyes, ears, and/or pancreas. Additionally, the Dmp53 tumor gene in Drosophila melanogaster (aka wMel) binds specifically to human p53 (which is implicated in 1/2 of human cancers). Wolbachia is extremely powerful and should never have been allowed to be put into a species (the Aedes genus of mosquito) that never had it in the first place. But we are told to limit our use of antibiotics, to "wait out" pink eye, to forgo digital rectal exams, and that strep A infections are causing deadly infections. And, I highly suspect that the legalization of cannabis will be blamed for the almost 60 percent dive in sperm counts among men from North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. In this paper, I walk you through what may become chaotic for ER physicians and staff within the next few years in North America.

Health
by RoseWrites
4 months ago
100 shares
It's Willful Negligence to NOT Test for Wolbachia Genes in Blood

Anyone associated with the WHO (World Health Organization), NIH (U.S. National institutes of Health), or who relies on funding from Bill and Melinda Gates has no business being employed (in any capacity) to protect human health. The WHO endorsed the use of Wolbachia-infected Aedes even after it was detected in a human (without the nematode). The NIH actually granted MosquitoMate $1.3 Million dollars. Therefore, Canada's chief medical officer of health, Theresa Tam, and Allison McGeer should resign. Dr. Tam has "served as an international expert on a number of World Health Organization committees". Dr. McGeer is "an expert reviewer for the NIH (US National Institutes of Health)" and "has recently been working with the World Health Organization (WHO)".

Health
by RoseWrites
5 months ago
100 shares
The Link Between Uveal Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin's B-Cell Lymphoma, and Wolbachia

I am still baffled that no one appears willing (in North America) to conduct a a broad range PCR screen for infection by Rickettsiales (Wolbachia genes detected in blood) before determining that a patient has uveal melanoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We have documented proof of a patient who recovered from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (in 2015) once his Wolbachia infection was treated. And in this case, there was no trace of the nematode worm that emits it. Instead, we are told, "Since the causes are not understood, there is no known way of preventing this disease." Now that the EPA is allowing MosquitoMate to release Wolbachia-infected Aedes males into the environment in 20 U.S. states, we had better take notice of the uptick in rare cancers (like uveal melanoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and demand that humans be tested for Wolbachia infections. Because there are treatment options: azithromycin, doxycycline, minocycline, or rifampicin. Some of these, I believe, can even be taken in combination.

Health
by RoseWrites
6 months ago
Uveal Melanoma and/or Lymphoma? R/O Rickettsiales (Wolbachia)

I am increasingly becoming unnerved and alarmed by the striking correlations between Wolbachia-infected Aedes releases and life-threatening symptoms in young people. Even though the media isn't covering it, Culex spp. are Zika vectors. And in two of those Culex types - when they naturally acquired Wolbachia - became better vectors of West Nile virus and malaria. I highly suspect the same holds true for Zika. What every oncologist needs to know: Wolbachia can infect humans without any trace of the nematode that emits it. So, before removing eye balls or beginning any drastic form of treatment for lymphoma, you need to rule out (via a broad range PCR screen for infection by Rickettsiales), Wolbachia genes in the blood and tissues of these patients. We have strong antibiotics that can treat this infection.

Health
by Yindee
2 years ago
Protease enzymes compete with drugs used for sclerosis, psoriasis, tight chests, fibrocystic diseases, blood clots and cancer

During silkworm reproduction an enzyme is secreted to help them emerge from cocoons as moths. It is so powerful that it can dissolve tough bundles of fibrin strands and inanimate tissue in order to break out and start a new life. We too, can harness the power of this proteolytic enzymes like serrapeptase to cure sclerosis and other diseases based on excessive fibrin formation.

Health
by Carola Finch
2 years ago
Common Cancer Myths Debunked

A look at some common myths about cancer prevention and treatment

Health
by Fran5050
2 years ago
Angels and Miracles - Living With Cancer

Living with cancer is not easy. Sometimes miracles do happen and there may even be guardian angels watching over you

Health
by Darren Leon
3 years ago
How Can You Lower Your Risk of Cancer?

While cancer is frequently seen as a condition that arises without warning, recent research findings reveal that it is a result of long-term environmental and lifestyle factors. Doctors and specialists of disease prevention have studied multiple behaviors that can influence the prevalence rate of cancer. The following lifestyle choices can help reduce the risk of this life-threatening condition.

Health
by Marjorie Cliff Picard
3 years ago
5 Online Breast Cancer Support Groups That are Worth Visiting

The journey through breast cancer is traumatic for many. Support comes from family and friends, and we can use all the outside help that we can get. Online groups are available for more emotional help and for accessing more knowledge.

Health
by curiosity44
3 years ago
4 Things You Can Do To Prevent Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer is one of the most deadliest cancers among American women. It is caused by an abnormal growth of cells in the cervix which is part of the reproductive system. This connects the uterus and vagina. Generally, cells grow gradually over time, and sometimes develop into cancer. Unlike...

Health
by curiosity44
3 years ago
4 Things You Can Do To Prevent Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the second most deadly form of cancer for women in the United States. It occurs when cancer cells of the breast grow uncontrollably and develop into tumors. This is often the result of abnormal gene mutations which controls cell growth. In women that have symptoms of...

Health
by curiosity44
3 years ago
4 Things You Can Do To Prevent Prostate Cancer

Prostate Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. According to one study, 1 out of every 6 men will be diagnosed with this disease in their lifetime. The prostate is an exocrine gland of the reproductive system which in front of the rectum below the urinary bladder....

Health
by Yindee
3 years ago
Don't get Booby Trapped into the Clutches of Cancer

Many of my friends who became vitctims of cancer were unaware of their options. How many choices did they have? It's not cool to have cancer. How to handle it is up to you, not the doctor.

Health
by RoseWrites
3 years ago
Calling On Scientists and Doctors: Fukushima and What Doesn't Add Up

I'm frustrated that no one is answering my questions about the safety of our food - as it pertains to the presence of radiation caused by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Once I found out that the CFIA and FDA stopped testing for radiation in our food two years ago, I became even more concerned. Along the way, I blindly accepted the WHO's new acceptable residential level of radon - which is oddly one tenth what it was in 1996. These numbers and studies just don't add up.

Health
by Yindee
3 years ago
Control Cancer - Thrive and Survive on Positive Protocols

Positive ways to control cancer can help you thrive and survive! study your options, get a second opinion and use these popular protocols.

Health
by OmegaBeings
3 years ago
Top 10 Foods to Prevent and Cure Cancer

What we eat has a huge bearing over our health and well-being. What most people are unaware of is that it is possible to prevent and cure many of the diseases prevalent today with certain foods rather than prescribing to drugs.

Health
by RoseWrites
3 years ago
200 shares
Fukushima's Radiation: Why I Fear for Canadians

In 2012, The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) stopped testing for radiation in imported foods. This is alarming since scientists, doctors, and researchers know that radiation in the food chain takes time to show up on our dinner plates - sometimes many years. We cannot dilute radioactive isotopes. Once consumed by aquatic life, the radioactive isotopes re-concentrate by orders of magnitude in each step along the food chain. This is where North Americans have been led astray. 

Health
by HawkEye79
3 years ago
Ways to Detect Cancer Early

Helpful tips to detect cancer in the early stages. Signs and symptoms explained into order for readers to be aware of, as well as, determine if you need to seek medical attention.

© Copyright 2008 - 2018 by My Passion Media Inc. Terms of Service Privacy Policy XML Sitemap