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Technology
by RoseWrites
2 weeks ago
Tracing Zika's Path to Florida, Culex, and Wolbachia

The case for the Culex genus of mosquitoes as Zika vectors is becoming stronger. Aedes prefer to live indoors and never stray far from people. So, it was a surprise to learn that Florida's Zika outbreak stemmed from about 30 cruise ship passengers. What's more, evidence is mounting that Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes are not effective in the long-term and may even enhance viral infection. Problem is: Wolbachia can never be taken back. Is it too late to restore critical ecosystems? I don't know, but more Wolbachia-infected mosquito releases are set to take place in Florida, India, Selangor, Vietnam, New Caledonia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), and Medellin (Columbia).

Technology
by RoseWrites
1 month ago
Red-Whiskered Bulbul: Zika's Ideal Reservoir Host

Just when I thought Wolbachia-infected mosquito releases were a big coincidence in certain Zika-endemic regions of the world, the perfect reservoir is paired up with them. And this bird doesn't migrate; therefore, the poorest people in the world are once again the most vulnerable. What's worse: discovering outright lies by public health authorities and the omission of glaring scientific facts. Looking for Zika in birds is about as fundamental as plugging in your computer.

Technology
by RoseWrites
2 months ago
Why Are We Asking Bill Gates About the Next Pandemic?

I think Bill Gates has tinkered enough with human health. An editorial in the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics linked 47,500 new cases of non-polio AFP [Acute Flaccid Paralysis] to Bill and Melinda Gates' polio vaccines. I haven't delved into the polio claims, but in the case of Zika, I feel strongly that Bill Gates has blindly plunged ahead into dangerous territory promoting Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. I just hope it's not too late to restore ecological balances in areas where these releases have been carried out.

Technology
by RoseWrites
2 months ago
More Proof: Wolbachia-Infected Mosquito Releases Might Be Causing the Most Devastating Zika Infections

The WHO ignored the early warnings in February 2016 about the Culex genus of mosquitoes and now Zika is spreading throughout the poorest regions of the globe. Our public health authorities failed to contain the virus and repeatedly downplayed or ignored crucial scientific facts. Culex mosquitoes in Brazil and China are spreading Zika (which means birds are likely reservoir hosts). What's worse: Wolbachia that is acquired by any species after (or perhaps along with) a Zika infection is probably enhanced by Wolbachia. Bottom line: Wolbachia-infected mosquito releases are likely at the root of this global pandemic and their detrimental impact to humans (and other vertebrate species) must be investigated by independent researchers.

Technology
by RoseWrites
2 months ago
Why We Need to Investigate Wolbachia-Infected Mosquito Releases

Some scientists have sold their souls, apparently. After reading a study that blamed El Niño for the spread of Zika, I couldn't help but delve deeper into what Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes might be doing to humans. And as I researched further, it became clear why Culex mosquitoes have been dismissed as Zika vectors: Wolbachia-infected Aedes mosquito releases are heavily funded by four governments (including Bill Gates). And they could be causing more harm than good.

Technology
by RoseWrites
3 months ago
Zika: The Warnings About Wolbachia and Culex Our Health Authorities are Ignoring

Over the past few days, I've been shocked to see and hear obvious attempts to downplay Zika's similarities to West Nile virus. And what I discovered sent chills up my spine. It's possible that a seemingly harmless mosquito control method (using the bacterium Wolbachia) could enhance the Zika virus in Culex mosquitoes. And Culex have finally been acknowledged as a vector of Zika (by the WHO). In California and Florida, Culex mosquitoes are everywhere. And it appears that dangerous decisions have been (and are being) made by our public health authorities that we can never undo.

Technology
by RoseWrites
3 months ago
Birds as Reservoir Hosts of Zika: What You Are Not Being Told

No surprise: money is probably at the root of why the public (and many in the scientific community) are ignoring, omitting, or downplaying the fact that the Zika virus is found in birds. Forty-five years ago, 15 percent of birds studied in Uganda were found to be reservoir hosts of the Zika virus. That percentage would only increase as Zika has spread and mutated around the globe. And Culex are also vectors of the Zika virus (this has been proven by three independent research teams out of Brazil, China, and Canada). Those culpable for the most harmful strain of Zika may be the backers of Wolbachia-infected mosquito releases. The people involved include Bill and Melinda Gates and the following governments: UK Department for International Development, United States Agency for International Development through the Combating Zika and Future Threats Grand Challenge, Australian and Queensland governments, and the Brazilian government. With those deep pockets and power, it's no wonder why crucial studies and reports have magically disappeared from the internet.

Technology
by RoseWrites
3 months ago
Egos: The Real Reason Scientists are Unable to Solve Zika Mysteries

Once I researched Wolbachia some more, I realized there has been a dangerous precedent already set in motion in California, Brazil, Columbia, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Australia. Two separate research teams found Culex infected by a specific type of Wolbachia caused a totally unexpected result: an increase in West Nile and malaria infections. Culex already harbor Wolbachia, however, there are numerous strains of this bacteria. Since the WHO has finally admitted that Culex are also a vector of Zika, I felt it was prudent for Florida (and other regions of the world) to be aware of the risks involved with Wolbachia-based mosquito control and to test out whether local Culex - that will eventually acquire it naturally from the Wolbachia-infected Aedes - will become (or are already) a more worrisome vector of the Zika virus.

Technology
by RoseWrites
3 months ago
303 shares
Wolbachia-Infected Mosquitoes Might Reduce Dengue, Enhance Zika, and Cause a Million Souls to Become Sterile

The carelessness of our public health authorities over the Zika virus has disappointed me immensely this past year. And just when I thought there would be some signs of remorse, WHO's director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan, blamed the vector control strategies of countries in southeast Asia. Meanwhile, she has known since February 2016 that Culex mosquitoes were also a likely Zika vector that require entirely different eradication methods. But even worse: Wolbachia-infected Aedes mosquitoes have been released in various regions of the world for the past six years. And while Wolbachia in Aedes may not be transmitted to humans; Culex mosquitoes are capable of acquiring it and transmitting it. Culex are able to infect humans with filarial worms infected with Wolbachia. And Wolbachia seem to play an inordinate role in diseases. For weeks I pored over studies and found to my utter shock that Culex with Zika and Wolbachia could be responsible for some of the most devastating outcomes for human life.

Technology
by TanoCalvenoa
2 years ago
Three Critically Endangered Sea Turtles

Three of the seven sea turtle species on Earth are critically endangered, which is the most severe rating given for a wild animal. The decline of these species and others around the world can be attributed to the activities of human beings, and more can and should be done to minimize the harm being done. The three critically endangered sea turtle species are the hawksbill, Kemp's ridley, and leatherback sea turtles.

Technology
by Yindee
2 years ago
Rhino Horn is Useless as a Medicine so Why Kill Them?

Imagine paying a small fortune for an illegal dose of rhino horn only to find out it is medically inert? Tests show that rhino horn was useless as a medicine for treating fever, inflammation, cramps or water retention for instance. Do we need to kill rhinos if chewing your own fingernails is as ineffective as rhino horn?

Technology
by TanoCalvenoa
2 years ago
Modern Tigers Versus Ancient Saber-tooth Tigers

The extinct Smilodon is the largest cat species to ever live, and the Bengal tiger is the largest cat found on our planet today. The modern Bengal tiger and Smilodon, an ancient saber-tooth cat, were similar in size although had some major differences.

Technology
by mariuski
3 years ago
From Elver to Eel: the Odyssey

Elvers are born in the Sargasso Sea, they cross the ocean and go upstream the rivers in Europe, where they become eels. They live their whole life there and then come back to the Sargasso Sea, where they leave their eggs and die.

Technology
by JudyE
3 years ago
A Closer Look At Three Endangered Antelope Species

There are a number of endangered antelopes. One of these is the addax or screwhorn antelope. It is also called the white antelope. Another is the saola, also known as the Vu Quang ox or Asian unicorn. A third is the giant sable antelope, endemic to the region of Angola between the Cuango and Luando rivers. As it is the national symbol of Angola, it is held in high esteem.

Technology
by weianow
6 years ago
Facts About Leopards an Endangered Species

Of the 20 subspecies of leopards, eight of them are on the endangered species list and four are on the critical list.

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