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History
by Indexer
4 years ago
Queen Mary I: The Monarch Who Took Her Revenge On England

17th November is not a date that is generally celebrated in England but perhaps it should be. In 1558 a hated monarch died and a new age - the Elizabethan Age - was born. The queen who died - Mary the First - was mourned by few.

History
by dwest61506
5 years ago
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Early Mathematician and Philosopher

The German mathematician, logician, political adviser, and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was credited with his independent invention of integral and differential calculus.

History
by Bo Alexander
5 years ago
Stockholm Bloodbath

Stockholm Bloodbath are the executions Kristian II of Oldenburg ordered to have effect on the town square in Stockholm on seventh to ninth of November 1520 after his coronation to become the king of Sweden.

History
by T_William_Cook
5 years ago
Black Shuck - the Devil Dog of Eastern England

Does a killer apparition, in the shape of a huge dog, stalk the roads of Norfolk and Suffolk?

History
by CatFood
5 years ago
When And Why Did The Great Divergence Occur?

This article will explore what historical factors caused the rapid development of Europe over Asia.

History
by T_William_Cook
5 years ago
Sor Juana - the First Woman of North American Literature

The story of how a Mexican nun became the first great writer of North America.

History
by PensiveScholar
5 years ago
King Edward VI: The King Who Never Grew Up

King Edward VI, son of King Henry VIII and the only male heir for the Tudor throne, was only a child when he stepped onto the throne and died as a teenager. Still, his reign has made a lasting impact upon English history, altering its course and structuring the Church of England.

History
by Fran5050
6 years ago
Christine de Pisan - Successful Business Woman in Medieval Times

Christine de Pisan, the first known professional female writer, successfully supported her family by writing poems and ballads for the European nobility of the Middle Ages.

History
by Crystal
6 years ago
21 Unbelievably Bizarre Foods Eaten in Medieval Times

A list of 21 bizarre foods that were eaten by people in Medieval times. 

History
by Sage6Paths
6 years ago
Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice: Aspects of Christian Conformity

A strained relationship can change the way in which we interpret the dynamics of a story and can help us better understand the essence of the characters involved. In The Merchant of Venice, Jessica's relationship with her father, and society's predominantly Christian influence on her life, leads her down...

History
by Sage6Paths
6 years ago
Shakespeare's King Lear: Free Will and Justice

Shakespeare’s King Lear explores universal human conflicts that transcend time, culture, and age. As the play progresses, we are led down a path of uncertainty, which makes us question the bonds between parents and offspring, and also between siblings. Furthermore, we are engulfed by the plot, and enraged by...

History
by Fran5050
6 years ago
Court and Craft: A Masterpiece from Northern Iraq - Book Review

Court and Craft: A Masterpiece from northern Iraq presents new research findings into the little-known Courtauld bag, an absolutely magnificent inlaid metalwork bag dating from about AD1300.

History
by Fran5050
6 years ago
The North French Miscellany - A Medieval Hebrew Manuscript

The magnificent and luxurious North French Miscellany is one of the most important Hebrew manuscripts in the British Library's collection, attracting calligraphers and historians from around the world.

History
by Amerowolf
6 years ago
Harald Hardrada - The Last Viking

Harald Hardrada is best known for his failed attempt to conquer England in 1066, which resulted in his death. That event was largely considered to be the end of the Viking era, though Viking kings ruled long after his death. However, anyone familiar with Scandinavian history will know that the term "Viking" is more of a job title and not the name of the people. However, Harald Hardrada led quite the adventurous life before his claim to fame, and that is by Viking standards, who generally got around to a few places. Harald Hardrada was born Harald Sigurdsson, and was the youngest of King Olaf II of Norway's three half-brothers. When he ascended the throne as King Harald III of Norway, he picked up the moniker of Hardrada which translates to "hard rule."

History
by TheGuitarNomad
6 years ago
A Concise Explanation Of A Secret Society: Four Things You Must Know about Illuminati History

The Illuminati History has continued to both fascinate and scare people about the existence of secret societies, but does it really exist? This article will give you an insight of how a historical covert institution has once plotted goals of world power and control that would leave you wondering: Is the truth more unbelievable than fiction?

History
by Amerowolf
7 years ago
History's Great Murder Mystery - The Princes in the Tower

The mystery behind the princes in the tower is one of the longest lasting murder scandals in England's history, primarily because it has never been definitively proven what happened to them. The princes in the tower refers to king Edward IV's two sons, Edward the eldest son who was briefly Edward V and Richard 1st Duke of York who was the Edward IV's second born. After Edward IV's sudden death due to natural causes, his brother Richard of Gloucester ousted his nephew from the throne and claimed it for himself. The two princes were imprisoned in the Tower of London where they would later disappear.

History
by crin
7 years ago
Was Dracula A Monster?

At the beginning of the seventies, I was working as a tour guide in Romania, for the only agency which was state-owned. It was a lot of fun, however at times there was a lot of work, and not enough hours to rest, but overall, it was not a bad experience. Here are some stories related to a tour whose main character was... Dracula

History
by ologsinquito
7 years ago
The Sack of Rome and How Our Lady of Capocroce Saved a Town

The town of Frascati was spared from destruction in 1527 when a miraculous painting "spoke" and ordered the invaders away.

History
by weianow
7 years ago
Who is That Masked Man? The Legend of the Ninja

Sometimes the myth outshines the reality and so it is, in some aspects, with the ninja warrior of Japan. 

History
by ologsinquito
7 years ago
The Miraculous Painting of Madonna and Child that Unites Ireland and Hungary

The "Irish Madonna of Hungary" is a miraculous painting that hangs in the Gyor Cathedral. It wept tears of blood on Saint Patrick's Day in 1697.

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