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Polishing articles in little ways

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103 posts
Member since Aug 13, 2014

I notice little details when I read, possibly because of my legal and publications background. These details enhance the professional shine your article already has. Smile

 

  • Punctuation goes inside the quote mark. Exceptions are ? and ! unless they are part of the quote.
  • Spell out numbers under 10. Always spell out a number when it's the first word of a sentence.
193 posts
Member since May 2, 2012

Helpful tips indeed.

I know I occasionally second guess myself with the puncutation and quotes one. Then once I start second guessing myself I wish I would've paid closer attention in my Language Arts classes as a kid. :D

301 posts
Member since Aug 22, 2014

Thank You @JoyceBocek,

Punctuation inside the quotation marks confuse me too. Glad I came by this thread.

6 posts
Member since Mar 19, 2014

Good to know about it. Thanks for share...

3,131 posts
Member since Oct 18, 2009

In American English, punctuation goes inside the quotation mark. The opposite is true of British writers.

If you use words like "just" and "only," the meaning of the sentence changes depending on where the word is used. Most people tend to put these just before the verb, whereas that is often the place they don't want it. In the case of "only," about 70% of the time people actually mean what the sentence would say if it follows the verb.

1,552 posts
Member since Jan 26, 2014

And Canadian writers play mix and match with these things. (JK)

3,131 posts
Member since Oct 18, 2009
RoseWrites said:

And Canadian writers play mix and match with these things. (JK)

Actually, I do, too, because of my complex relationship with English. :)

I was brought up in the United States and lived there until my 30s. Then I moved to Europe, didn't speak any English for many years, and had to relearn to use it, and learned from mostly British sources.

That makes me one of the few people without a "mother tongue," so to speak.

1,552 posts
Member since Jan 26, 2014
classicalgeek said:
RoseWrites said:

And Canadian writers play mix and match with these things. (JK)

Actually, I do, too, because of my complex relationship with English. :)

I was brought up in the United States and lived there until my 30s. Then I moved to Europe, didn't speak any English for many years, and had to relearn to use it, and learned from mostly British sources.

That makes me one of the few people without a "mother tongue," so to speak.

Well, I was born and raised in Canada so I don't have a good excuse like you (my punctuation habits are based on a guess). And when I get it wrong, I blame the Brits or the Americans - but mostly the Brits because I'm secretly terrified of the Americans. (Plus there's an ocean between us).

103 posts
Member since Aug 13, 2014
classicalgeek said:

In American English, punctuation goes inside the quotation mark. The opposite is true of British writers.

If you use words like "just" and "only," the meaning of the sentence changes depending on where the word is used. Most people tend to put these just before the verb, whereas that is often the place they don't want it. In the case of "only," about 70% of the time people actually mean what the sentence would say if it follows the verb.

Just and only is toying with my brain right now. And look at the phrase "... tend to put these just before the verb ..." implies only before the verb, no other place.  Just also means lawful, as in "That was a just decision." Sometimes the words are used before a noun -- it's just me, or it's only me.

The English language is so much fun to play with.

3,131 posts
Member since Oct 18, 2009

In this case, the meaning of just approximates "very near by," because the sentence is dealing with place or time. Related uses are: "It's just gone 4 o'clock" or "You parked the car just over there."

4,295 posts
Member since Mar 1, 2011
RoseWrites said:
classicalgeek said:
RoseWrites said:

And Canadian writers play mix and match with these things. (JK)

Actually, I do, too, because of my complex relationship with English. :)

I was brought up in the United States and lived there until my 30s. Then I moved to Europe, didn't speak any English for many years, and had to relearn to use it, and learned from mostly British sources.

That makes me one of the few people without a "mother tongue," so to speak.

Well, I was born and raised in Canada so I don't have a good excuse like you (my punctuation habits are based on a guess). And when I get it wrong, I blame the Brits or the Americans - but mostly the Brits because I'm secretly terrified of the Americans. (Plus there's an ocean between us).

You should be afraid of us. One of these days we're going to annex you.

501 posts
Member since Mar 31, 2012
vicdillinger said:
RoseWrites said:
classicalgeek said:
RoseWrites said:

And Canadian writers play mix and match with these things. (JK)

Actually, I do, too, because of my complex relationship with English. :)

I was brought up in the United States and lived there until my 30s. Then I moved to Europe, didn't speak any English for many years, and had to relearn to use it, and learned from mostly British sources.

That makes me one of the few people without a "mother tongue," so to speak.

Well, I was born and raised in Canada so I don't have a good excuse like you (my punctuation habits are based on a guess). And when I get it wrong, I blame the Brits or the Americans - but mostly the Brits because I'm secretly terrified of the Americans. (Plus there's an ocean between us).

You should be afraid of us. One of these days we're going to annex you.

This is conjuring up images of the Ukranians and Russians for me right now. 

501 posts
Member since Mar 31, 2012
RoseWrites said:
classicalgeek said:
RoseWrites said:

And Canadian writers play mix and match with these things. (JK)

Actually, I do, too, because of my complex relationship with English. :)

I was brought up in the United States and lived there until my 30s. Then I moved to Europe, didn't speak any English for many years, and had to relearn to use it, and learned from mostly British sources.

That makes me one of the few people without a "mother tongue," so to speak.

Well, I was born and raised in Canada so I don't have a good excuse like you (my punctuation habits are based on a guess). And when I get it wrong, I blame the Brits or the Americans - but mostly the Brits because I'm secretly terrified of the Americans. (Plus there's an ocean between us).

I have an excuse too. Was raised on British English but spent time in the US and have been bombarded with the American airwaves and online and print media for most of my life. To add to the fun, I have one American client and one Brit.

501 posts
Member since Mar 31, 2012

Oh and my kid is raised on British English (I confuse her every now and then) but CBeebies on TV has half its programs in American and half in Brit.

1,552 posts
Member since Jan 26, 2014

Well, it's no wonder you are all excellent writers.

But I'm still afraid of Americans - I mean look at Amerowolf there with that gun right in yer face.

2 posts
Member since Sep 3, 2014

Can I use images from internet for my article?

Anyone tell me please..!!

1,552 posts
Member since Jan 26, 2014
nabeel_hasan said:

Can I use images from internet for my article?

Anyone tell me please..!!

The simple answer: NO (read the Newbie's Guide). An excerpt from the Newbie's Guide by classicalgeek:

"You must have rights to use images. Finding an image on Google isn't enough. Using a Creative Commons image isn't enough. Not even linking back to the images is enough. If you don't understand how licensing works, it's best to use images in the public domain."

 

For public domain photos, try: Wikipedia: Public domain image resources or your own photos.

2 posts
Member since Sep 3, 2014

Thanks RoseWriters...!

it's mean I should use free images sites like pixabay.com and freeimages.com etc

1,552 posts
Member since Jan 26, 2014
nabeel_hasan said:

Thanks RoseWriters...!

it's mean I should use free images sites like pixabay.com and freeimages.com etc

Not sure what you mean, but you might also want to check out classicalgeek's article: My InfoBarrel Article Has Been Denied for Using English Awkwardly

228 posts
Member since Jun 11, 2012
nabeel_hasan said:

Thanks RoseWriters...!

it's mean I should use free images sites like pixabay.com and freeimages.com etc

YES. That's exactly what she means.

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