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Running For Beginners

By Edited Feb 21, 2016 0 0

So you want to run?

Perhaps this is a step towards a healthier lifestyle, literally and metaphorically, or the beginning of your journey to complete your first Ironman triathlon. Whatever the motivation, it can be daunting, especially as an adult to start to do something new.

Running like any other sport has its own lingo, its own cliques, its own gear etc. so for the new-comer it can feel like a bit of a minefield.

Fear not my friend, running is easy, it is what humans are designed to do (read Christopher McDougall's born to run if you don’t believe me) so take heart in the fact that even if you are not currently a runner, you can become one! Like with any new exercise please consult your doctor before you start to ensure you are not taking a risk with your new pastime. It will help you to consider the following 5 things after you have consulted with your physician.

  1. Equipment- The most important part of your running gear is your shoes. I would highly recommend that you go to a specialist running

    running shoes(97215)
    shop to get a pair of shoes that suits how you run. This will depend on your anatomy, in particular your gait (the way locomotion is achieved using limbs) and it should be assessed by an expert who can then recommend the best shoes for you. If you are serious about running you do not want to get injured, proper shoes can reduce this risk. Otherwise wear clothing that feels comfortable and allows for free movement. Many brands provide technical gear to make running more comfortable, with technical gear to wick away sweat and reduce rashes.
  2. Take it slow- Begin with walking. Get out in the fresh air and build up the time you walk for until you can walk without difficulty for 20-30 minutes. Once you can do this start to introduce a slow run (jog) for short bursts, 30 seconds or a minute. Slowly build up these intervals until you can run for longer distances before a walking break.

  3. Stay hydrated- there is plenty of evidence in the literature and press that we should aim to consume 2.5 litres of water a day. This will differ from individual to individual however when you are exercising your requirement will be greater, so bear this in mind. If you start running longer distances you may need to take essential salts with your fluid to prevent hypernatremia (electrolyte disturbance characterised by low sodium). Most sports drinks contain sodium for this very reason. My rule of thumb is that i will take additional water and/or sports drink with me when running for longer than an hour, for shorter sessions i will rehydrate after the session but everyone is different.

  4. Think Recovery- whilst you are running you do not actually gain fitness or stamina; it’s the period after a training session when stamina and strength etc. are developed. The running is stressing your body, the recovery is allowing the physiological changes to take place that will repair any damage and allow your bodies system adapt to improve your ability to respond to the new regime. Think carefully about how often you run to allow adequate recovery. Initially perhaps 3 times a week will be enough but become aware of what your body tells you. If you are sore, reduce the frequency or intensity. What you eat also plays a key role in your body’s ability to recover. Eat plenty of fresh fruit, vegetables and lean meat.

  5. Enjoy it- most things in life are easier to do with a smile, running is no different. be patient, you cannot expect to be running a 4 minute mile a week after taking up running but you can expect to feel different. There is lots of evidence to show that people feel better after running, this will be in part due to the release of endorphins (a chemical produced by the body during exercise that can produce a feeling of well-being) and it is a great escape from the day to day things that can cause stress.

 

 Beginners Training Plan

I have provided a short plan to be done over the course of 8 weeks. Like all plans it is simply a template, please alter it to suit you. If a week has been particularly challenging please repeat that week before moving to the next. If you can’t complete a week due to illness or any other reason please repeat the previous week before continuing. By the end of this you should be able to run 30 minutes continuously. You will be in great shape to tackle a 5km race should you feel the need. There are plenty of plans out there to assist you in doing this.

 

  MONDAY TUESDAY   WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY   SATURDAY SUNDAY  
WEEK 1 15 min walk rest

30/60sec run/walk

x10

rest rest

30/60 run/walk

x10

rest
WEEK 2 20 min walk rest

60/60 sec run/walk

x7

rest rest

90/60sec run/walk

x7

rest
WEEK 3

60/60 sec run/walk

x8

rest rest

3/1min run/walk

x5

rest

3/1min run/walk

x6

rest
WEEK 4 30 min walk rest

4/1min run/walk

x4

rest rest

5/2min run/walk

x4

rest
WEEK 5

4/1min run/walk

x4

 rest

 rest

 7/2min run/walk

x2

 rest

 8/2min run/walk

x3

 rest
WEEK 6  5/2min run/walk

x4

 rest

 8/2min run/walk

x3

 rest  rest

 12/2min run/walk

x2

 rest
WEEK 7

10/1min run/walk

x2

rest

 10/1min run/walk

x2

12/1min run/walk

x2

rest

 15/1min run/walk

x2

rest
WEEK 8

15/1min run/walk

x2

rest

 20 min run

rest

rest

 30min run

rest

 

Don't forget to smile

Smile
 

 

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